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Author Topic: CHEAP SOLUTION - worth a try  (Read 6394 times)

JD

  • Guest
CHEAP SOLUTION - worth a try
« on: October 25, 2005, 03:11:00 PM »

I will share a cheap solution that worked for me in hopes that you all can save some money on keeping the noise out. First off, a few resounding concepts that make sense – 1. Create an air pocket between your current window and “something else” – which in this case is another piece of glass. 2. Isolate the additional glass from the existing window by “floating it”.  3. Caulk every last hole/leak.  So here are the mechanics of it; I used a very noisy bed room with 2 (new vinyl ) windows facing a busy street (could hear everything that came down the block). As an experiment I picked up 2 aluminum storm windows from a home center for $38 each. I also picked up the best ¾” rubber weather stripping they had (4 rolls X $7.50). I placed the weather stripping (peel and stick) around the inside of the frame (the part that contacts the house) and overlapped them to make sure that there would be no leaks. I then screwed the storm windows to the INSIDE of the window frame (I have thick moldings so it was 5 minute surface mount job). When complete, the storm window is now on the inside of the house with the rubber weather stripping acting as the isolation between the storm window frame and the house. I did this as an experiment as I wanted the largest air pocket possible. When you mount a storm window on the outside, it sits only 1-2” from the existing window and is probably more apt to vibrate then a true vinyl window (storm window frames are far from tight). The results are amazing. While it’s not whisper quite, I would say that I successfully removed 80% of all noise from the street. For $100 investment, I can deal with the remaining 20%.

The downside – To open the storm window (the spring-loaded catches are now facing the street) you have to drill a hole in the bottom of the frame so that you can insert a pencil or screwdriver (or something) to push the catches (if you know storm windows, you will know what I mean). I am sure with some thought I can work out a better solution.

Also, for some of you, you may not want a storm window inside your house; however, if you have curtains, you do not see the top, or sides of where the storm window meets the window moldings. If you are a bit of a perfectionist like me, you will invest another $30 and run some wood moldings around the edge of the storm window frames.



To cheaply test what I did, go buy 1 storm window that is at least 1” wider and taller then your window.  Buy 1 package of ¾ self stick weather stripping (not foam – it compresses too easily – you want as rubbery as possible).  The weather strip is your maximum risk as if you do not like the instant results, you have to peel it off before you return the storm window. Follow the instructions above, but do not screw the storm window in place – just hold it against the window (make sure you have a good seal).

Now listen to the noise when you hold it against the window, and then slide it aside a few inches and listen. I am sure you will not be able to get to the home center fast enough to buy more. If it fails, return the window, eat your time and the $8 worth of weather strip. I say it’s worth the shot.



What’s next to test (in another noisy room); Test A; Mounting the storm the same way to the outside of the house, but build a small 1” frame to further push the storm window away from the house to create a larger air pocket. Test B; Mount both an interior and exterior storm window on a single window (Storm+window+storm).  If I can find my decibel meter, I will post results of each test.



I am sure that there are plenty of folks who will site scientific reasons why this is not a proper solution, but you cannot argue with results. Take the $50 risk and try it for yourself.

supersoundproofing

  • Guest
Re: CHEAP SOLUTION - worth a try
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2005, 11:21:09 PM »

Good solution- Some other solutions that may work better is at:
http://www.soundproofing.org/options_sound_control_for_windows.htm


BJ Nash

wav3form

  • Guest
Re: CHEAP SOLUTION - worth a try
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2007, 03:31:55 AM »

This is an old topic but I'd like to comment.  I bought a storm window and attempted this but it absolutely does not work.  You would need the perfect molding or window to do this.