Author Topic: A basement home theater...  (Read 3288 times)

Dave

  • Guest
A basement home theater...
« on: February 26, 2001, 02:17:56 AM »
I am installing a home theater in my basement with three of its four walls being of the foundation.  Therefore, I am concerned with the noise travelling to the room above more than travelling from room to room in the basement.  I have a few questions:
- Is it necessary to use resilient channels on any of the foundation walls in addition to the ceiling?
- Would it be necessary to install the resilient channels in the ceiling of the adjacent room to keep sound proofing characteristics intact?  
- How should the duct work (that is framed) be handled?  Should both the ceiling portion and the vertical portion utilize resilient channels?
- Should I put insulation in the ceiling joists or leave them empty?  (I doubt I will install a sound barrier or absorbant mat due to the cost factor.)
Thanks in advance for your help,
Dave

Shawn

  • Guest
Re: A basement home theater...
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2001, 01:41:17 AM »
Well Dave, looks like we are sort of in the same boat. I hate to bring you this news, but unless you are willing to put in tones of cash,you will not sound proof your room, which is essentally what you have to do so that sound will not travel up into the rooms above. I have been doing a lot of research on the matter lately. I have settled for trying to muffle the sound. All I have apprenetly done is absorb the sound. Basically stopped reverberation. This will make my home theater sound better but will not stop sound from traveling. Trying to stop sound from traveling in a house is like trying to hold a lot of water in your hand.
Anyway on to your questions,
Question 1 - Yes, you should use resilient channels on all the walls. The reason is becasue te resilient channel helps stop the vibrations from travelling up your joists to the rooms above. (notive the word "helps"
Question 2- If you contain the sound to just your one room then there is no need for resilient channels in the adjacent room. But you must not let the sound out, which then goes into taking the proper steps to stop sound, which no matter which way you look at it COSTS MONEY.
Question 3 - You can fill the duct work with absorbant foam and channels to help reduce the vibration up the duct work. I am not sure of the mathmatical equation but it all depends on the nuber of bends and the size of the duct. Also remember that if you put insulation in the duct work you wil reduce the amount of air that can flow through it so you may have to replace your ducts with larger sizes. I am not quite sure of when you ask about rewhat your asking here "Should both the ceiling portion and the vertical portion utilize resilient channels?" So I will skip that and move on.
Question 4 - Ceiling joist should be filled with mass in between your floor board and ceiling to stop the sound from traveling up to the rooms above. To stop sound you have to block sound. If you simply absorb it you are not blocking it. It will still travel up through the floor. I put in 2 layers of Safe N' Sound insulation in between my joists and it reduced the sound but only minimally. You also have to caulk and seal any holes. I I was putting up a resilient channel and doubling or tripling the wall board I would then completely fill the space between the ceiling and floor board. Again mass kills sound.
Don;t forget to also caulk you outlet's, lighting, and light switches. You will also have to get a new heavy door. I have read that the best senario is a double door. Anyway, the STC value of a normal cheap builders door (the tyoe you get when you buy a new house) has an STC value of only 20, where as a heavy door will give you an STC of about 30.
Anyway, I am in no way an expert, but have done quite a bit of reseach lately. I started off trying to sound proof my hometheater room and well without a lot of preperation, time and money you can't do it. Your room is only as quite as it's weakest link.
As I stated above, I am now going for GREAT sound and trying to limit the amout of sound that travels to the rooms above.
I hope this helps. I have included a link. If you can view .pdf's (acrobat files) it's definitely worth a read.... Hope I helped a bit???
Shawn


: I am installing a home theater in my basement with three of its four walls being of the foundation.  Therefore, I am concerned with the noise travelling to the room above more than travelling from room to room in the basement.  I have a few questions:
: - Is it necessary to use resilient channels on any of the foundation walls in addition to the ceiling?
: - Would it be necessary to install the resilient channels in the ceiling of the adjacent room to keep sound proofing characteristics intact?  
: - How should the duct work (that is framed) be handled?  Should both the ceiling portion and the vertical portion utilize resilient channels?
: - Should I put insulation in the ceiling joists or leave them empty?  (I doubt I will install a sound barrier or absorbant mat due to the cost factor.)
: Thanks in advance for your help,
: Dave


Shawn

  • Guest
Re: A basement home theater...
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2001, 01:42:01 AM »
Well Dave, looks like we are sort of in the same boat. I hate to bring you this news, but unless you are willing to put in tones of cash,you will not sound proof your room, which is essentally what you have to do so that sound will not travel up into the rooms above. I have been doing a lot of research on the matter lately. I have settled for trying to muffle the sound. All I have apprenetly done is absorb the sound. Basically stopped reverberation. This will make my home theater sound better but will not stop sound from traveling. Trying to stop sound from traveling in a house is like trying to hold a lot of water in your hand.
Anyway on to your questions,
Question 1 - Yes, you should use resilient channels on all the walls. The reason is becasue te resilient channel helps stop the vibrations from travelling up your joists to the rooms above. (notive the word "helps"
Question 2- If you contain the sound to just your one room then there is no need for resilient channels in the adjacent room. But you must not let the sound out, which then goes into taking the proper steps to stop sound, which no matter which way you look at it COSTS MONEY.
Question 3 - You can fill the duct work with absorbant foam and channels to help reduce the vibration up the duct work. I am not sure of the mathmatical equation but it all depends on the nuber of bends and the size of the duct. Also remember that if you put insulation in the duct work you wil reduce the amount of air that can flow through it so you may have to replace your ducts with larger sizes. I am not quite sure of when you ask about rewhat your asking here "Should both the ceiling portion and the vertical portion utilize resilient channels?" So I will skip that and move on.
Question 4 - Ceiling joist should be filled with mass in between your floor board and ceiling to stop the sound from traveling up to the rooms above. To stop sound you have to block sound. If you simply absorb it you are not blocking it. It will still travel up through the floor. I put in 2 layers of Safe N' Sound insulation in between my joists and it reduced the sound but only minimally. You also have to caulk and seal any holes. I I was putting up a resilient channel and doubling or tripling the wall board I would then completely fill the space between the ceiling and floor board. Again mass kills sound.
Don;t forget to also caulk you outlet's, lighting, and light switches. You will also have to get a new heavy door. I have read that the best senario is a double door. Anyway, the STC value of a normal cheap builders door (the tyoe you get when you buy a new house) has an STC value of only 20, where as a heavy door will give you an STC of about 30.
Anyway, I am in no way an expert, but have done quite a bit of reseach lately. I started off trying to sound proof my hometheater room and well without a lot of preperation, time and money you can't do it. Your room is only as quite as it's weakest link.
As I stated above, I am now going for GREAT sound and trying to limit the amout of sound that travels to the rooms above.
I hope this helps. I have included a link. If you can view .pdf's (acrobat files) it's definitely worth a read.... Hope I helped a bit???
www.nrc.ca/irc/fulltext/prac/bpn25.pdf
Shawn


: I am installing a home theater in my basement with three of its four walls being of the foundation.  Therefore, I am concerned with the noise travelling to the room above more than travelling from room to room in the basement.  I have a few questions:
: - Is it necessary to use resilient channels on any of the foundation walls in addition to the ceiling?
: - Would it be necessary to install the resilient channels in the ceiling of the adjacent room to keep sound proofing characteristics intact?  
: - How should the duct work (that is framed) be handled?  Should both the ceiling portion and the vertical portion utilize resilient channels?
: - Should I put insulation in the ceiling joists or leave them empty?  (I doubt I will install a sound barrier or absorbant mat due to the cost factor.)
: Thanks in advance for your help,
: Dave


 

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