Author Topic: soundproofing lesson, learned the hard way  (Read 16383 times)

paul m

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soundproofing lesson, learned the hard way
« on: March 07, 2003, 01:57:00 AM »
i feel the need to vent to the soundproofing community at large about 3 days of futile effort to soundproof the back room of my ground floor apartment for the purposes of a home recording studio.
after reading several accounts on the internet and deciding that the "room within a room" simply was not practical for the room in question (due to closet area, my need for windows, computer access area, very hot radiator pipes, oblong heating duct space, cost, etc.), i got the brilliant idea to contact a local carpet layer, who sold me remnants of underlay and carpet for $40. after attaching that all over my walls and ceiling and door (even around the hot pipes, yikes!) i got more remnants at the local dump for free. screw driver and nail gun in hand, i then doubled up on the carpet over the existing felt layer.
the room looked great, although very '70's with the violet shag everywhere. moment of truth: my neighbor couple began to laugh and play at night and my heart sank: i could hear them through the wall just the same as i could before my 3 days of labor and expense. if i could still hear them they could hear me, and my visions of recording (on a 1 year hiatus due to outspoken neighbor upstairs) were shelved.
in the morning i awoke with the idea of putting a floating plywood wall up against side neighbors, and a plywood ceiling up, keeping existing carpet and felt as under layer. at home depot, it was obvious i was going to have to buy a saw as well for this second stage, and i was thinking about it when a knowledgeable guy showed me homosote and soundstop board. a kid who works there then explained that these products would only work in conjunction with another, drywall layer, framed outside and filled with insulation--essentially the "room within a room" idea.
he had stories to tell of previous construction jobs specifically geared to sound reduction--most notably pouring 6" of concrete between steel reinforced wall forms, and the like. my heart sank even further as i saw my soundproof home studio vision wave bye-bye. i went home to take a last look at the possibility of a true "room within a room" in my small space.
what with the dropped heating duct, my need for light and windows in the room, required access to closet space, i saw a room within a room of about 5'X 4'; i just couldn't see it as being an possibility at that point. hating the dust that that damn underlay causes, i then decided to rip it all out, and sneak it out to the dumpster. 2 van loads later, here i am, with holes all over my apt. that i'll have to caulk sometime.
don't do what i've done and think you can soundproof with carpet, underlay, or the like. you'll read this same advice time and again and still might want to do it, because the alternative just doesn't make sense in your situation (perhaps). now i'm faced with the inability to record or even play and sing at even moderate volume. all that seems to remain is the reality that in order to play and record in a home studio environment, i must move.
you're welcome to write me, pavsongs@yahoo.com
paul m


James

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Re: soundproofing lesson, learned the hard way
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2003, 04:44:50 PM »
-----
Thanks Paul,  the warning is taken...  I needed that.
--------
: i feel the need to vent to the soundproofing community at large about 3 days of futile effort to soundproof the back room of my ground floor apartment for the purposes of a home recording studio.
: after reading several accounts on the internet and deciding that the "room within a room" simply was not practical for the room in question (due to closet area, my need for windows, computer access area, very hot radiator pipes, oblong heating duct space, cost, etc.), i got the brilliant idea to contact a local carpet layer, who sold me remnants of underlay and carpet for $40. after attaching that all over my walls and ceiling and door (even around the hot pipes, yikes!) i got more remnants at the local dump for free. screw driver and nail gun in hand, i then doubled up on the carpet over the existing felt layer.
: the room looked great, although very '70's with the violet shag everywhere. moment of truth: my neighbor couple began to laugh and play at night and my heart sank: i could hear them through the wall just the same as i could before my 3 days of labor and expense. if i could still hear them they could hear me, and my visions of recording (on a 1 year hiatus due to outspoken neighbor upstairs) were shelved.
: in the morning i awoke with the idea of putting a floating plywood wall up against side neighbors, and a plywood ceiling up, keeping existing carpet and felt as under layer. at home depot, it was obvious i was going to have to buy a saw as well for this second stage, and i was thinking about it when a knowledgeable guy showed me homosote and soundstop board. a kid who works there then explained that these products would only work in conjunction with another, drywall layer, framed outside and filled with insulation--essentially the "room within a room" idea.
: he had stories to tell of previous construction jobs specifically geared to sound reduction--most notably pouring 6" of concrete between steel reinforced wall forms, and the like. my heart sank even further as i saw my soundproof home studio vision wave bye-bye. i went home to take a last look at the possibility of a true "room within a room" in my small space.
: what with the dropped heating duct, my need for light and windows in the room, required access to closet space, i saw a room within a room of about 5'X 4'; i just couldn't see it as being an possibility at that point. hating the dust that that damn underlay causes, i then decided to rip it all out, and sneak it out to the dumpster. 2 van loads later, here i am, with holes all over my apt. that i'll have to caulk sometime.
: don't do what i've done and think you can soundproof with carpet, underlay, or the like. you'll read this same advice time and again and still might want to do it, because the alternative just doesn't make sense in your situation (perhaps). now i'm faced with the inability to record or even play and sing at even moderate volume. all that seems to remain is the reality that in order to play and record in a home studio environment, i must move.
: you're welcome to write me, pavsongs@yahoo.com
: paul m



boborther

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Re: soundproofing lesson, learned the hard way
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2003, 08:41:19 PM »
I feel the need to vent to the soundproofing community at large about 3 days of futile effort to soundproof the back room of my ground floor apartment for the purposes of a home recording studio.

: after reading several accounts on the internet and deciding that the "room within a room" simply was not practical for the room in question (due to closet area, my need for windows, computer access area, very hot radiator pipes, oblong heating duct space, cost, etc.), i got the brilliant idea to contact a local carpet layer, who sold me remnants of underlay and carpet for $40. after attaching that all over my walls and ceiling and door (even around the hot pipes, yikes!) i got more remnants at the local dump for free. screw driver and nail gun in hand, i then doubled up on the carpet over the existing felt layer.

: the room looked great, although very '70's with the violet shag everywhere. moment of truth: my neighbor couple began to laugh and play at night and my heart sank: i could hear them through the wall just the same as i could before my 3 days of labor and expense. if i could still hear them they could hear me, and my visions of recording (on a 1 year hiatus due to outspoken neighbor upstairs) were shelved.

: in the morning i awoke with the idea of putting a floating plywood wall up against side neighbors, and a plywood ceiling up, keeping existing carpet and felt as under layer. at home depot, it was obvious i was going to have to buy a saw as well for this second stage, and i was thinking about it when a knowledgeable guy showed me homosote and soundstop board. a kid who works there then explained that these products would only work in conjunction with another, drywall layer, framed outside and filled with insulation--essentially the "room within a room" idea.

: he had stories to tell of previous construction jobs specifically geared to sound reduction--most notably pouring 6" of concrete between steel reinforced wall forms, and the like. my heart sank even further as i saw my soundproof home studio vision wave bye-bye. i went home to take a last look at the possibility of a true "room within a room" in my small space.

: what with the dropped heating duct, my need for light and windows in the room, required access to closet space, i saw a room within a room of about 5'X 4'; i just couldn't see it as being an possibility at that point. hating the dust that that damn underlay causes, i then decided to rip it all out, and sneak it out to the dumpster. 2 van loads later, here i am, with holes all over my apt. that i'll have to caulk sometime.

: don't do what i've done and think you can soundproof with carpet, underlay, or the like. you'll read this same advice time and again and still might want to do it, because the alternative just doesn't make sense in your situation (perhaps). now i'm faced with the inability to record or even play and sing at even moderate volume. all that seems to remain is the reality that in order to play and record in a home studio environment, i must move.

: you're welcome to write me, pavsongs@yahoo.com

: paul m

Paul,

I am glad you were kind enough to tell us the sad but true story of your soundproofing efforts. Many times soundproofing calls for compromises, and oft times those compromises involve the expenditure of "Cash". Most of us musicians don't like the "C" word, because we are usually cash deficient. However, there are ways to soundproof that don't cost a fortune. Sure purchashing the materials will cost you, but here at Soundproofing.org, you can get loads of free advice, which can save you a lot of time and trouble, not to mention costly and time consuming mistakes. Knowledge is power, and as you can tell from reading my many responses to all the postings, I do not always tout our products,  especially if a I know a common hardware store material will work for you.



I do however know the materials that do work, and will be effective in soundproofing an apartment room or closet, or perhaps a condo party wall. I am also versed on the materials that do NOT work! I don't think there are many soundproofing issues out there that I have not dealt with since starting here at Soundproofing.org.



The advice we give is sound (no pun intended) and are proven methods for soundproofing.



 Here's the bottom line, If you are recording in a hay barn, I'll be the first to tell you that hay bales are a good soundproofer. If you are a roofing contractor, I'll always let you know that rolled roofing is a good soundproofer.



Now if your situation requires more serious soundproofing agents, I will let you know that also. If I don't have the answer for you, I know where to find it. I don't think you will find any company more interested in your soundproofing issues, than us here at Soundproofing.org.



Thanks for you honesty in voicing your mistakes. You will never know how many people will benefit from your experiences, and will be spared from making costly mistakes.



Paul, there are solutions to your situation, and if you have the time to call, I will be more than happy to help you. Thanks again for this great posting.











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Super Soundproofing Sales/Technical Associate.

URL: www.soundproofing.org

e-mail: support@soundproofing.org  888 742 7723

















Kira

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Re: soundproofing lesson, learned the hard way
« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2005, 01:35:57 AM »
Hi Paul, my heart really goes out to you. I can identify with your situation: I have an older mobile home. (if you know anything about mobile homes them you know that insulation is essentially nonexestent!) I totally reinsulated the walls and put up new vapor barrier and 5/8" drywall thinking that not only would I get better insulation, I would get soundproofing too! (that was before I discovered this wonderful site!) The insulation is a lot better, but the sound? If it was better than I wouldn't be here :'( Fortunately I didn't tape or mud the walls so removing the drywall and putting it back up shouldn't be as large a hassle as it was the first time! :P
I'm hanging in there but boy are my arms getting tired! ;D

supersoundproofing

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Re: soundproofing lesson, learned the hard way
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2005, 12:32:33 AM »
There's more on our website about this- look in the myths page!

http://www.soundproofing.org/infopages/myths.htm

BTW- due to a move of our forum to another server, some messages may be out of order.
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melvinderby

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Re: soundproofing lesson, learned the hard way
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2016, 06:35:23 AM »
Thanks for the information