Author Topic: Shared Wall Solution?  (Read 8849 times)

Sleepless

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Shared Wall Solution?
« on: June 07, 2005, 02:40:51 PM »
I live in an old apartment building with plaster walls that seem have NOTHING between them.  A shared wall with my neighbor is so thin I can hear her rattling shopping bags.  Since my lease does not permit making any changes to the existing wall I need a solution that is completely removable with no damage when I leave.  My question is this - what about building a new "wall" out of those blue foam blocks builders are using for housing foundations (minus the concrete filling of course !) My bedroom is huge, and I can easily sacrfice the space needed to stack the blocks, plus a dead space between them and the existing wall.  Is dead air enough if nothing is actually touching my new "wall", or do I need mass as well?  And no, I wouldnt leave the blocks unfinnished, I am guessing I could cover them with something.  Any thoughts from acoustic gurus?

supersoundproofing

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Re: Shared Wall Solution?
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2005, 06:00:39 PM »
Your idea is a good one, but the materials must have a lot of MASS!  The foam you describe would have minimal effectiveness because of this.

We had one person who stacked bricks on his wall with good effect, but reported they tumbled out due to their weight an not having mortor to hold them, causing major damage.

Hay bales have been reported to work well, but there are also disadvantages.

Sound control curtains may help, but when the wall is as thin as you say, won't dosoundproofing to the level you desire.

http://www.soundproofing.org/infopages/curtains.htm

BJ Super Soundproofing
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guest

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Re: Shared Wall Solution?
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2005, 04:54:25 PM »
Hi,

I just purchased (and moved into) a townhouse and share a firewall with a neighbor who has mounted a HDTV on the wall.  Their entertainment system is on this wall as well.  As a result my home reminds me of when you're on the road in your car with your windows rolled up but still hear the thudding and vibration from the bass that's blaring from a neighboring car.  The neighbors don't want to consider mounting their HDTV and entertainment system to a different wall.  Is there anything I can do within my home to reduce the noise?  If I place a portable waterfall around the source of the noise would that help?  Anything else I can do?

Many thanks!

RSK

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Re: Shared Wall Solution?
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2005, 05:04:12 AM »
I really wish people could have an inch of consideration for all the people that live around them. Especially when they do things like that.  There was another post recently where someone wanted to play drums in a condo.  They couldnt understand why their neighbors complained. Thats kind of retarded. Whew, had to get that out!
Your best bet, and the one i'm still contemplating is adding more mass to the wall, possibly using Quietrock and alot of sheetrock over that to block out my neighbors bass from his stereo. And they like to blast it.  Adding mass is key.  I dont think that its possible to completly stop the problem but i'd bet its possible to reduce the annoyance significantly.
-Ryan

guest

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Re: Shared Wall Solution?
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2005, 07:59:18 PM »
Ryan, I can't thank you enough for suggesting QuietRock.  I called the manufacturer and found a supplier near me.  While I don't have it installed yet, I am so hopeful I could cry.  The stuff reduces noise (so they tell me) by 75%, or 20 decibles, is the equivalent of 10 sheets of drywall, and has a special polymer that makes the room 4x as quiet.  While it's a shame I have to make this expenditure in the first place, at least I feel like I may have my home back, and once again enjoy a serene relaxing environment instead of feeling bombarded as if living in a dormitory with bratty, irresponsible, inconsiderate idiots next to me as neighbors!

Thank you, Ryan!  I'll let you know how it goes!

supersoundproofing

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Re: Shared Wall Solution?
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2005, 09:31:41 PM »
Well, having read all this I must add that while Quiet Rock may have it's uses, low frequency sound will not be reduced all that much with the product.  Take a look at the STC rating at the low frequencies.

A better solution is a "False" wall where the walls never touch- or a floating wall using "SoundCLips"  as shown in http://www.soundproofing.org/options_in_sound_isolation.htm
This will reduce this low freq vibration much better than Quiet Rock.

BJ Nash
Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org

guest

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Re: Shared Wall Solution?
« Reply #6 on: August 24, 2005, 03:12:47 PM »
I'm new to all of this, BJ, and so, I don't quite understand what you mean by a floating wall or the clips.  I went to the link you provided and still don't understand (I recognize this is because of my limited knowledge about all of this).  I'd greatly appreciate a very basic layperson's-term kind of description of this alternative.  This is all still so very new to me...although with the kind of neighbors I have I've been forced to learn the hard way.

Many thanks, again,

Guest 2

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Re: Shared Wall Solution?
« Reply #7 on: August 28, 2005, 02:42:45 AM »
I'm in the same situation (neighbors with a great sound system), so I'm also interested in finding out how to deal with the bass trespassing in my family room. I've been thinking about adding a sheet of MLV to the existing drywall and then putting up another sheet opf drywall. Noit sure about this floating wall thing...

Ryan

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Re: Shared Wall Solution?
« Reply #8 on: August 28, 2005, 04:58:44 AM »
Please do let us know how it turns out. Its very important to get this kind of information out there. Are you installing the Quietrock on your own?  If its not too much trouble it would be great if you went into detail on how you used the product. Like over an existing wall or starting from the studs. Its important to know this stuff so that we can compare apples to apples or make adjustments to get comparable results. I'm just as excited as you are to try this stuff out and see if it works but unfortunatly for me its a little heavy on my pocket book at the moment.  Of Course if it turns out to really work well, and I pray that it does, i'll be digging deep into my pockets to give it a go too. I'm not sure if this board shows my email so here it is. Keep in touch. Ryankew600@hotmail.com

supersoundproofing

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Re: Shared Wall Solution?
« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2005, 05:19:31 PM »
A generalization of how to block sound through a wall (or ceiling) is to describe how sound transfers through such a partition:

The sound impinges on the panel and excites the molecules of it's structure, passing through it and into the supporting studs (or joists).  It then, (somewhat attenuated, depending on lots of factors) is reradiated by the panel on the other side, somewhat like a vibrating speaker cone.

One must keep in mind that the attenuation affects the sound by frequency, that is that some frequencies will be affected more than others.
The bandwidth (The range of frequencies under discussion) are the speech range- that is, those from about 200 Hertz (Cycles) to 4000 HZ.  Music tones can be much higher.  Lower freqs are more difficult to reduce than higher freqs.

Depending on the materials, some frequencies may not be affected at all!  This is why a range of frequencies is measured and plotted and the average called the STC of the material.  (Sound Transmission Class).  

STC was devised as a simple way to understand sound loss in a material by the Building Trades Industry to try to take the Mumbo-Jumbo out and make sound loss understandable to others than highly paid acoustical experts.  (Kinda like why attorneys and doctors can charge such high prices, because they use a language noone else can understand).

Without getting into details, (Ah, the details!) - one can better understand sound control  by keeping in mind some fundamentals:
1) Deal with the sound at the source, if possible.
2) Block sound by putting something between the source and the target.
3) Know your STC's!

Here's a link to more about this. http://www.hufcor.com/freedom.shtml#soundcontrol%20anchor
BJ Nash
Super Soundproofing Co
Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org

felex

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Re: Shared Wall Solution?
« Reply #10 on: October 10, 2005, 10:05:36 PM »
invest in a super high power amplifier + BIG speakers and put that up against the affect wall, and then try to blow there f**** ears out, if that dont work get the baseball bat out swing for your life!

Hickory

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Re: Shared Wall Solution?
« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2005, 06:21:22 PM »
REF: invest in a super high power amplifier + BIG speakers and put that up against the affect wall, and then try to blow there f**** ears out, if that dont work get the baseball bat out swing for your life!

You have the right idea, but better, use a microphone though the wall listening to their BS, then hook it to your humongous amp and speakers, blowing them away with threir own crap!