Author Topic: Dyno room  (Read 15113 times)

hfd1motorsports

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Dyno room
« on: October 15, 2005, 01:03:07 PM »
I have a Motorcycle dyno  the outer walls have a 3/8 plywood 3/4 foam sheating(inside) and then fiberglass batt insulation then 1/2 inch sheetrock. I build a 2x4 wall inside with fiberglass insulation and 5/8 firerock sheetrock. Noise was reduced greatly however I need greater reduction. I also need something for the sound reflectons inside the room. The bigger issue is the air intake and exhaust vents. The intake is routed to the inside via  a plenum (also built out of 5/8 sheetrock) that comes in the top of the dyno room. On the outside of the building I have built a hood that covers the intake out of 2x4...3/4 inch foam sheeting....5/8 sheetrock and 1/2 inch plywood. The exhaust is the same less the plenum on the inside. The roof of the dyno cell in made out of 2x10.....joists 3/4 plywood.... fiberglass batt insulation....5/8 sheetrock.
   The noise goes out the intake and exhaust what would be a good product to use on the inside of the plenums? What would be a good product to use on the inside of the room to help soak up some of the noise. The bikes rev to 15500 rpm and the twin cylinders rev to a lower rpm but the noise pulses are much deeper and penetrate more....oddly the db meter will show less on the high reving bikes but the twin bikes it gets ugly loud... any help will be greatly appreciated

gary chambers

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Re: Dyno room
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2005, 10:48:00 PM »
wow, over 800 people have looked at this forum regarding fixes for a loud dyno booth and not one answer, including myself. I spent  $120,000 on an all wheel chasiss dyno (Dynodynamics) and they can't help either. I went to the SEMA show and asked 4 different dyno manufactors for help. The best I got was google "industrial noise" It can't be that tough, can it?  Trying to explain that to my neighbors.   Gary

supersoundproofing

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Re: Dyno room
« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2005, 04:18:59 PM »
Quote
I have a Motorcycle dyno  the outer walls have a 3/8 plywood 3/4 foam sheating(inside) and then fiberglass batt insulation then 1/2 inch sheetrock. I build a 2x4 wall inside with fiberglass insulation and 5/8 firerock sheetrock. Noise was reduced greatly however I need greater reduction. I also need something for the sound reflectons inside the room. The bigger issue is the air intake and exhaust vents. The intake is routed to the inside via  a plenum (also built out of 5/8 sheetrock) that comes in the top of the dyno room. On the outside of the building I have built a hood that covers the intake out of 2x4...3/4 inch foam sheeting....5/8 sheetrock and 1/2 inch plywood. The exhaust is the same less the plenum on the inside. The roof of the dyno cell in made out of 2x10.....joists 3/4 plywood.... fiberglass batt insulation....5/8 sheetrock.
    The noise goes out the intake and exhaust what would be a good product to use on the inside of the plenums? What would be a good product to use on the inside of the room to help soak up some of the noise. The bikes rev to 15500 rpm and the twin cylinders rev to a lower rpm but the noise pulses are much deeper and penetrate more....oddly the db meter will show less on the high reving bikes but the twin bikes it gets ugly loud... any help will be greatly appreciated


<BR> *****************************
The best sound blocking/absorber to use for inside of ducts is is the closed cell vinyl-nitrile foam listed at the top of the page at:
http://www.soundproofing.org/sales/prices.html

BJ Nash  Super Soundproofing CO
Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org

supersoundproofing

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Re: Dyno room
« Reply #3 on: December 01, 2005, 04:34:21 PM »
Quote
wow, over 800 people have looked at this forum regarding fixes for a loud dyno booth and not one answer, including myself. I spent  $120,000 on an all wheel chasiss dyno (Dynodynamics) and they can't help either. I went to the SEMA show and asked 4 different dyno manufactors for help. The best I got was google "industrial noise" It can't be that tough, can it?  Trying to explain that to my neighbors.   Gary








Yours is not an uncommon problem.  When dealing with massive sound, one needs to take massive measures...



<BR>We've helped anumber of dyno owners with the following techniques- either a "room-within-a-room" or more better chance of sucess, consider putting the dyno in a semi-truck container, after insulating that.  



<BR>First, MLV (Mass Loaded Vinyl) or Lead, (Lead is better but more expensive), http://www.soundproofing.org/infopages/flooring.htmis pop riveted to all inside surfaces of the container. Then "Sound Clips"  http://www.soundproofing.org/options_in_sound_isolation.htm are mounted to the walls and ceiling and rails of hat channel are placed on them, supported by small vibration pads.   Now a combination of 1/4" foam (see next post), and sound deadening board is mounted to them, covered with another layer of MLV and finally covered with 5/8" sheetrock. aircon and venting problems have to be worked out on a individual basis, anyone here at the Super Soundproofing Co. can answer your specific questions about that.







BJ Nash




Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org

JohnSkuz

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Re: Dyno room
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2006, 04:53:39 PM »
For Dyno noise suppression, I'm thinking about:

TheCarlsonCompany.Com

Might want to check them out.
They claim 40 dba (I don't know if that's transmission or reduction).

I've visited several successfully Engine & Chassis Dyno installations and 8" concrete block filled with concrete does a nice job especially when combined with pre-stressed concrete planking as a ceiling.

John

INC_noiseguy

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Re: Dyno room
« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2006, 03:54:44 PM »
First off, please see my NOTICE at the bottom. OK...

There are basically 2 approaches taken: either "do-it-yourself " or purchase a commercially available solution. There are actually a small number of other companies out there providing rooms- as one poster suggested you can do a Google or Yahoo search. And while many users have successfully created "do-it-yourself" solutions, you should understand that doing so does require significant knowledge, time, effort and expense. In my (biased) opinion, for most people the commercial solution turns out to be better and less expensive.

But either way, what needs to be dealt with is the same: A) Ventilation, B) Cooling, and C) Noise. AND... while at the same time providing room to work, adequate light, etc. and a design that promotes general safety. Meeting all these needs together requires a thoughtful design. The commercial solutions have usually worked this out, the do-it-yourselfers will have to be sure to address it.

To block noise transmission, a tightly sealed room of sufficiently dense material needs to be constructed. Cinder block and drywall can be used. But remember the "weakest link" theory holds true here too, and a room is not just walls! The door and windows all have to seal up tight and be sufficiently dense (such as acoustical windows and doors are designed to be). Any cutouts need to be tightly sealed- or (as for air intake and exhaust) need to somehow be "silenced" or "muffled" or "baffled".

To improve the environment inside the room for the technician, it is wise to provide as much noise high-performance acoustically absorptive surface area as possible. The DIY-er will need to add material to their walls, the commercial walls typically already contain such an absorber.

The commercial approach is typically a room constructed of modular steel panels of the type used for decades in industrial settings to enclose nasty noise sources. These have a solid skin on one side that is the noise barrier, and a perforated skin on the other side. Within the panel is some type of high-performance noise absorber material. (Typically mineral wool or Fiberglass.) The perforated side faces the noise source (i.e. faces inside the room.)

The panels fit into channels and rooms go together like an erector set. Acoustical window panels and doors are included as integral components. Electrical, lighting, finishes and other features are often offered as options.  A room properly constructed of 4" thick panels will typically reduce the noise transmission by 35-40dBa.

As for ventilation... there almost can never be too much. The biggest mistake, and fairly common, is to provide too little. Sufficient air flow will "kill two birds" in the design goals: ventilation per se (removal of exhaust gasses), and cooling. For a 12x15x8 room we recommend a 24,000 CFM exhaust system. BUT remember, moving air itself makes noise, and getting air in and out of the room means big openings. So as mentioned above, these openings need to be "silenced". Commercial systems employ baffle pans, silencers and the like. The do-it-yourselfer can purchase these components to be integrated into their rooms, or in some cases can build their own.

Well that's sort of a general overview. Hopefully it sheds some light on the subject!

=====================================
NOTICE: Full Disclosure: I work for a noise control company in sales, and among the products I sell are modular dyno test rooms. I understand that advertisement is not appropriate in this forum. Therefore I am taking great care to provide general information while avoiding any direct solicitation. And in these matters I will of course trust the moderator to moderate, if my posts do not fit in properly.








 

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