Author Topic: Audio Alloy Green Glue  (Read 23340 times)

johnbergstromslc

  • Guest
Re: Audio Alloy Green Glue
« Reply #15 on: July 03, 2006, 04:23:16 PM »
Induray:

I have used it and it works.  It's by no means a 'miracle' product - it's not gonna magically kill all the sound - but it definitely helps at the lower frequencies.

If you're concerned about performance, check out their website (audioalloy.com)  They now have independent, third-party acoustical tests available online, both with and without Green Glue.  You can compare that way.  

If cost is the issue, it's much better to go with an additional sheet of drywall per side ($8 per sheet, per side) versus going with a lesser amount of drywall and a layer of Green Glue.  Green Glue adds $30 per 4X8 sheet, per side to the construction, at the recommended 'dosage'.  In most ways, you'll get much better performance with more mass.  The downside is it adds thickness to your wall.  Sometimes you can't afford to lose the space.

Just make sure you have excellent sealing, regardless of what you decide.  

You mentioned in one of your posts you wanted to do some tests and try to find some sort of dB ratio (dB before/dB after) to evaluate performance.  Admirable, but in my opinion, this is the wrong way to approach the problem.  

Inside a quiet house the 'background' noise level is about 30 dB.  If your neighbor comes home and plays his stereo/TV at 90 dB (hopefully the worst case scenario) and you have a standard, wood stud wall (STC 33) separating the two rooms, then his noise will impact you to the tune of 57 dB, approximately.   If you're trying to soundproof and reduce his noise to the 'background level' of 30 dB, you need to upgrade the structure to an overall STC of 60.  This is not so easy (or cheap) to do.

If you could live with 40 dB of noise (and increase the ambient noise in your space to compensate), you'd need a wall with an STC of 50.  This is much more viable.  

So, if as you've said, you'd like to do it as cheaply as possible, consult books/websites on soundproofing and find the configuration that achieves STC 50 as cheaply as possible.  I can tell you right now, it won't be with Green Glue, Quietrock, MLV, or any of the other 'advanced' products out there.  It'll have resilient mounting or structural decoupling and lots of mass.  

Personally, what I have found works best is to convert a regular stud wall into a staggered stud, sealed and insulated, with 2 layers of 5/8" drywall per side (or maybe 3 layers on one side, since you don't have access to the other).  This achieves an STC of about 57-58, and all the materials I can get at Home Depot/Lowes.  And, unlike building a double wall, you keep your fire blocking intact and don't get into trouble with the building inspector.

It really sounds like you're overthinking the problem.  I say just go for it - buy a case of Green Glue and do one wall.  Stick your ear up to it and if you like what you hear (or don't hear -  yuk, yuk..) then do the rest of them.  If not, switch to the less expensive way.  

Just keep in mind that some of the noise is going to 'flank' around the wall, and you might find you have to do the floor and/or ceiling too.


johnbergstromslc

  • Guest
Re: Audio Alloy Green Glue
« Reply #16 on: July 18, 2006, 10:50:05 PM »
Give it up, Andy.  Quietrock is too goddamn expensive and you know it.  If you were so confident about your product, you would state the prices in your posts...

How about it?

Besides, this forum is run by supersoundproofing.  They might not appreciate you trying to muscle in on their turf...

joel

  • Guest
Re: Audio Alloy Green Glue
« Reply #17 on: August 04, 2006, 03:32:31 PM »
Hello induray,



Green Glue was recently used by Boston University in a new student performing arts room.  The application was done by students with no formal construction experience.  Results were excellent - noise was contained within the room and surrounding areas were quiet.  Green Glue sandwiched between drywall is a simple and highly effective soundproofing solution for walls.



By the way, Audio Alloy is now known as The Green Glue Co.



Joel

jamesboyd

  • Guest
Re: Audio Alloy Green Glue
« Reply #18 on: August 29, 2006, 02:08:57 AM »
Looking at some of the posts, one thing strikes me. There's a lot of talk about STC and the problems with low frequencies, but STC doesn't measure low frequencies.

For the record, the data is pretty clear that Resilient channel stinks in the low frequencies. Also, the data you see? It's OLD, and that type of RC hasn't been made in years. YEARS. The stuff available now is too stiff. Either way, it doesn't do you any favors in he low frequencies.

agtrojan

  • Guest
Re: Audio Alloy Green Glue
« Reply #19 on: August 30, 2006, 09:27:53 PM »
You're right about not having a standard method of testing transmission loss below 125Hz.  However, the Green Glue Co. has invested in obtaining independent lab reports to measure the transmission loss at frequencies between 31Hz and 80 Hz.

Take a look at the following :

http://www.greengluecompany.com/images/transmissionLossTests/OL05-1035_Report.pdf

Using Acoustic Cotton Fiber insulation instead of fiberglass will improve the soundproofing quality of the system.  Take a look at the specs for the Cotton Fiber insulation:

http://www.soundproofing.org/brochures/SSP%20Cotton%20Fiber%20Insulation.htm

induray

  • Guest
Re: Audio Alloy Green Glue
« Reply #20 on: August 31, 2006, 09:48:00 AM »
Great Thread! Thanks for the info and please keep it coming!

Induray

johnbergstromslc

  • Guest
Re: Audio Alloy Green Glue
« Reply #21 on: August 31, 2006, 01:15:29 PM »
Again, with the cotton...

Give us a frickin' break, it doesn't work that much better!!!

joel

  • Guest
Re: Audio Alloy Green Glue
« Reply #22 on: August 31, 2006, 09:29:39 PM »
Hi induray,

I am not an audio alloy (now called the Green Glue Company) employee.  We have used it.  In fact, a contractor we know used it in his daughter's music practice room ceiling (there was not enough ceiling height to install other systems) to stop her "noise" from going up into the parent's bedroom.  It worked so well for him that he orderd another 10 cases to do the entire music practice room and one of his clients rooms as well.

The outside (independent) test data that supports Green Glue effectiveness in many construction applications is extensive and impressive.  More importantly, it can be duplicated and verified by anyone.

Joel

 

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