Author Topic: sound isolation with no room modifications  (Read 5716 times)

john park

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sound isolation with no room modifications
« on: December 16, 2005, 05:37:04 AM »
Hi, I just came to ask a quick question.
I tend to do a lot of my recording late at night, normally my dad is sleeping in the room next to me. I usually get a lot of complaints. So I need a solution to stop the sound from going through the walls.
This is a small room, and pretty crowded so I dont't have space for anyhting outrageously big. Thanks for any help.

supersoundproofing

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Re: sound isolation with no room modifications
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2005, 05:48:40 PM »
Quote
Hi, I just came to ask a quick question.
I tend to do a lot of my recording late at night, normally my dad is sleeping in the room next to me. I usually get a lot of complaints. So I need a solution to stop the sound from going through the walls.
This is a small room, and pretty crowded so I dont't have space for anyhting outrageously big. Thanks for any help.


The Three BASIC Rules OF SOUND CONTROL- Without the Mumbo-Jumbo.

For our purposes, Soundproofing, (Not acoustical absorption or reflection), there are two kinds of sound- Acoustical or "Airborne" sound waves and Impact or "Vibratory" sound.

Each has to be treated in it's own separate way.

While there are combination materials, which affect both of these types of sounds, they are not effective enough to control both types of these sounds. It is best to use two types of materials when confronted with this situation. For airborne sound, MLV (Mass Loaded Vinyl) has been shown to be effective when used properly. Closed cell foam to absorb sound is usually effective for vibratory sound. MLV with a closed cell backing would be such a combination material and may be effective enough in some situations.

The first rule of sound control is to put something between the source of the sound and the target to block it or absorb it, depending whether it's airborne or vibratory sound.

Acoustical sound in a closed area usually cannot be reduced by just absorption.

The second rule is to try to deal with the sound as near the source as possible. This is because sound radiates out and after reaching a large area, is more difficult to control.

The third rule is to choose the appropriate material for the sound, or combination, depending on its loudness and frequency range.

In your case the entire wall must be covered- leaving out only enough soundproofing material to amount to 2-3% of the wall surface can reduce the effectiveness of the job by half.
See http://www.soundproofing.org/treatments_for_sound_control.htm

 

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