Author Topic: Nothing Spectacular  (Read 5823 times)

AzraelXaero

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Nothing Spectacular
« on: June 29, 2006, 03:50:05 PM »
My girlfriend and I are moving into an unfinished basment at the end of the summer and we are looking to do some soundproofing. We're trying not to make this a huge projuect and I don't think we'll be making too much noise. Our roomate's bedroom is directly above ours so our bedroom needs to have some sort of sound proofing of course. What's the best to go about with too much hassle?

johnbergstromslc

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Re: Nothing Spectacular
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2006, 12:10:55 AM »
Sounds like you'll be putting up some resilient channels....

Insulate the floor joist cavities, put up resilient channels perpendicular to the floor joists and put on 2 layers of drywall.  Seal the edges with a flexible caulk.  

AzraelXaero

  • Guest
Re: Nothing Spectacular
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2006, 10:47:27 PM »
Thanks for the tip. One question...what are resillient channles??

johnbergstromslc

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Re: Nothing Spectacular
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2006, 02:53:18 AM »
You can get them at Home Depot or Lowes.  Ask for 'hat channels' or 'drywall furring channels' (steel).  

Sounds like you'll also need an instruction sheet for installation.  

While you're at it, go to the home page of soundproofing.com and check out the SSP clips; they are a further refinement of resilient mounting and a lot more forgiving to install - less errors, less short-circuiting.  

AzraelXaero

  • Guest
Re: Nothing Spectacular
« Reply #4 on: July 07, 2006, 02:31:20 PM »
What exactly do they do? As I'm sure you've guessed I'm new to this concept.

johnbergstromslc

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Re: Nothing Spectacular
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2006, 04:34:49 PM »
They sort of act as a spring mounting, breaking the vibrations of the drywall panel.  Instead of fastening the drywall directly to the underside of the floor joists, you screw up these metal channels and screw the drywall into the steel and, if you do it right, you structurally 'decouple' the system.  The vibration is dampened.

You install them 24" on center and they cost about 2 bucks for a 10' length.  So a 10' X 10' room would require 5 or 6 channels, adding an extra 10 or 12 dollars to the project (but you might want to buy some extra to compensate for mistakes).  If you feel handy enough to try it, it's the cheapest way to soundproof.  And they're ideal for a ceiling application.  

The SSP clips that supersoundproofing sells adds another 'spring' to the system.  Rather than fastening the channels directly to the joists, you install them in a rubber bushing that reduces vibration even more.  They run about 5 bucks, and you'll need one every 8 sq.ft., so for 100 sq.ft. it would add 60-70 bucks to the project.  

And doubling up the drywall also helps; the more mass the better.  Mounting of the electrical box for the light is also important; better to use an 'old work' electrical box (ask an experienced electrical guy at Home Depot/Lowes and he will show you what they are and how they work), cut an isolated hole and not nail it directly to the joists.  Finally, sealing:  You have to seal the gaps and penetrations, around the perimeter, the seams in the drywall and anywhere the electrical box penetrates the ceiling.  Pretend the room above is going to be filled with water and seal up your ceiling to stop it.  Anywhere water can get through, so can air (or more rightly, the air can transfer it's sound.)  

I know you wrote "without too much hassle", but if it's an unfinished basement, with exposed joists, the noise will be unbearable.  Hell on earth.  I guess you have to judge how long you're going to live there vs. how much money you'll have to spend.  It's always a trade-off.

If you decide to go for it, refer to the manufacturers literature or online manuals for detailed instructions.  

AzraelXaero

  • Guest
Re: Nothing Spectacular
« Reply #6 on: July 12, 2006, 03:47:39 PM »
Awesome Thanks a bunch. We do plan on living there for a long time, this is exactly the solution I was looking for.


Thanks again.

AzraelXaero

  • Guest
Re: Nothing Spectacular
« Reply #7 on: July 12, 2006, 03:49:50 PM »
One more quick question...just occured to me. I noticed you had said that the channels are 10'. Is that 10' I'm going to lose is overhead space? Or are they 10' long and mount horizontily?

johnbergstromslc

  • Guest
Re: Nothing Spectacular
« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2006, 11:59:48 PM »
No, they're 10 feet long, 2 1/2 to 3 inches wide and 1/2 inch deep.  You install them flat against the joists so you only lose 1/2" of headroom.  

If the project I described seems too large for you to handle, you can also simply put up 2 layers of drywall on your ceiling.  It won't be as good as with res. channels, but will be a lot better than a single layer.

skip

  • Guest
Re: Nothing Spectacular
« Reply #9 on: August 26, 2006, 04:49:51 PM »
Another approach to dealing with the ceiling would be that of filling the open joist areas with a Flame Retardant Cotton Fibre, Sound Absorbing Material. Take a look at:/http://www.soundproofing.org/infopages/natural_fiber.htm.

Then put a layer of 1/8" thick Mass Loaded Vinyl and finsih with a layer of 5/8" thick Dry Wall.

Take a look at:/http://www.soundproofing.org/infopages/flooring.htm.

 

anything