Author Topic: Isomax celing and wall quesitons  (Read 4205 times)

dlrecord

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Isomax celing and wall quesitons
« on: January 15, 2007, 09:16:20 PM »
All,

I am new to this forum and have been reading and research as much as I can on the use of Isomax clips, drywall furring channels, and two layers of 5/8th inch sheet rock separated with Green Glue with R-30 insulation above.  I have a few questions regarding the ceiling/wall intersections.

Our interior walls are single walled tongue and groove boards nailed directly into the ceiling joists above I believe.  I am wondering if I can screw Isomax clips into the existing walls and then hang one layer of 5/8th sheetrock on the outside so that I don't have to deconstruct the existing walls and frame out entirely new walls?

Also, I wonder the same thing about the ceiling.  We currently have Canec fiberboard panels serving as our ceiling which are nailed directly into the ceiling joists.  Do I need to pull these panels or can I screw the Isomax clips through the panels and into the ceiling joist directly, thereby leaving the old panels in place? 

Our main problem is the neighbor above who pulled her carpet to expose hardwood floors.  Unfortunately, her hardwood floors are nailed directly to the joists with no subfloor.  So we have her hardwood floors above with only our fiberboard panels and no insulation at all.  We have talked to her about the extreme noise but at this time is unwilling to do anything about it. So the goal is to reduce or eliminate the impact sounds and vibrations as best we can on our side.

Thoughts and advice appreciated,

-Dan

johnbergstromslc

  • Guest
Re: Isomax celing and wall quesitons
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2007, 11:35:09 PM »
Well, as in life, the hard way will usually yield the best results.

Just my opinion, but unless your tear all the old work out, you'll be taking shortcuts that will disappoint you in the end. 

You definitely want to tear off the ceiling.  If you don't, you'll still have a deep cavity with no insulation in it.

Do you live in Hawaii?  That's the only place I've seen T&G boards used as stand-alone walls (on "This Old House").


dlrecord

  • Guest
Re: Isomax celing and wall quesitons
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2007, 03:57:12 AM »
John,

Yes, Hawaii.  Good call.

I was considering pulling the ceiling anyway but thought the Canec board might serve as an extra layer of insulation...I am considering redoing some electrical anyway so pulling the ceiling panels makes good sense.

Thanks,

Dan

johnbergstromslc

  • Guest
Re: Isomax celing and wall quesitons
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2007, 05:49:51 AM »
Yeah, most people assume that having multiple layers of wood/drywall/whatever between them and the noise source helps to deaden the sound better, but in some ways it's just the opposite.  The best soundproofing (for a given mass) is 2 massive layers, structurally decoupled from each other with as big as possible airspace and non-rigid, absorbtive insulation filling the cavity between them.

Here's a link that will shed some light on the subject:

http://www.greengluecompany.com/understandingTripleLeaf.php

I'm glad you're considering using the isolation clips.  In combination with hat channel, they really improve performance of your soundproofing partition vs. using channel alone.  The bad resonance 'dips' in the lower frequencies are all but eliminated.  Be sure to do some good sealing, too.

dlrecord

  • Guest
Re: Isomax celing and wall quesitons
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2007, 08:07:21 PM »
Hi John,

I am curious about the wall and ceiling intersections.  Do I leave the T&G single walls as are and run the drywall sheets up to the walls with a 1/4" gap all around?  I assume I would need to use some type of caulk to get a good seal between the sheetrock and the T&G walls then...  I just wonder if the walls themselves are a noise concern or if the new ceiling itself will reduce the majority of the sound problem.  Any thoughts on that particular issue?

Thanks,

-Dan

johnbergstromslc

  • Guest
Re: Isomax celing and wall quesitons
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2007, 01:20:06 AM »
I think fixing the ceiling will take care of most of the problem.  You can always do the walls later.