Author Topic: Ceiling noise  (Read 4008 times)

Russ

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Ceiling noise
« on: April 17, 2001, 09:24:32 PM »
I live in a new condo which is supposed to have superior soundproofing but doesn't. I expected to hear footsteps from the unit above me, but what I'm getting seems excessive (even if he is a heavy walker). I hear not only footsteps but sometimes also rattles and vibrations. The noise is particularly bad within the large bedroom and the ensuite bathroom. There I can hear a lot of noise including bathroom (!) sounds, the sound of conversation (one time very clear but maybe it was coming through the bathroom vents at that time), opening and closing of closets and drawers, his wake-up alarm in the morning (which I'm thinking I can use as a back-up alarm for my own!), etc.
- The upstairs unit has carpeting with rather heavy underlay (including in the bedroom but not in the bathroom or kitchen areas). Interestingly, none of the neighbours I've talked to seem to have heard the same level of noise from above them, though they do hear walking.
- According to the information I was given when I purchased this unit, construction is as follows:
- Under floors: 3/4" OSB T & G ply nailed (corner tacked, glued and screwed.) 1" gypcrete.
- Fire rated ceilings: R-20 blow in insulation 5/8" type X drywall on resilient sound channel.
- Interior dropped ceiling: 1/2" drywall.
- The ceiling in most rooms have light fixtures and sprinklers. It's also a "great room" design meaning that the living room, dining and kitchen areas pretty much have one big unsupported ceiling.
- A worker who was in to do some finishing touches was surprised that I would ever hear conversation from the unit above me and thought it conceivable that they had left out the insulation. I've noted by tapping on the ceiling that some areas sound more hollow than others (especially in the areas where I've heard conversation). But I've been told that lack of insulation can only be confirmed by cutting a hole in the ceiling and having a look.
- Questions:
1. Should I be hearing this level of noise with this type of construction, especially if the resilient channels were properly done?
2. If insulation is lacking, will blow-in insulation solve the problem or was this pretty useless to begin with?
3. Would a dropped ceiling with insulation help--or is this even a possibility with these ceiling fixtures  (sprinklers and lights)?
- Thankfully my upstairs neighbor is pretty amiable and not home much, but if he ever sells and somebody more noisy moves in . . . Oi!
- The building still isn't finished, so the builder is still on-site. I'm pretty certain he'll deny that there is a problem, so I'm trying to gather as much information as possible before I approach him.
- By the way, the walls are great and I don't hear a peep from the neighbor beside me! Which makes the shoddy ceiling construction rather surprising.  
Russ


Russ

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Re: Ceiling noise
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2001, 05:11:09 PM »
As an addendum to my earlier post, I should also say that there was some water damage to the ceiling before I moved in. The sprinkler system in the upstairs unit went on and soaked through various areas. I didn't realize this until some workers came in to repaint what was apparently a replastered part of the ceiling and part of one wall (higher up toward the ceiling). I thought it was just the result of some sloppy work until some workers came in to fix it. At that point they told me about the water damage. They said that the builders would no doubt had properly dried it out afterwards, but now I wonder. Could the water damage account for the present problems with soundproofing?

bjnash

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Re: Ceiling noise
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2001, 03:23:35 AM »
: As an addendum to my earlier post, I should also say that there was some water damage to the ceiling before I moved in. The sprinkler system in the upstairs unit went on and soaked through various areas. I didn't realize this until some workers came in to repaint what was apparently a replastered part of the ceiling and part of one wall (higher up toward the ceiling). I thought it was just the result of some sloppy work until some workers came in to fix it. At that point they told me about the water damage. They said that the builders would no doubt had properly dried it out afterwards, but now I wonder. Could the water damage account for the present problems with soundproofing?
Yes the water damage could cause problems, the only way to know is to cut some holes and have a look up there. And, no, you should not have these problems with a ceiling on resilient channel: something has gone terribly wrong.

 

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