Author Topic: How do I install recessed lighting on a soundproofed ceiling  (Read 12281 times)

seb

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How do I install recessed lighting on a soundproofed ceiling
« on: March 14, 2007, 08:00:52 PM »
It is a known fact that if there are gaps (even quite small) on a soundproofed surface, the soundproofing effect will be dramatically reduced.

Knowing that, how do we install recessed lighting (or electrical boxes for light fixtures or receptacles) without compromising the sound absorbtion performance of a wall or ceiling? Won't the fixtures create unwanted gaps? How do the professionals installers deal with that?

 ???



johnbergstromslc

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Re: How do I install recessed lighting on a soundproofed ceiling
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2007, 01:47:18 AM »
You can try 'airtight' recessed cans, but they're not 'old work' - you have to nail them to the joists, then install the drywall. 

Generally, recessed lights are a bad idea.  The only way to truly make sure your soundproofing isn't compromised is to frame up a false ceiling or soffits for the cans.

bjnash

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Re: How do I install recessed lighting on a soundproofed ceiling
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2007, 04:59:30 PM »
It is a known fact that if there are gaps (even quite small) on a soundproofed surface, the soundproofing effect will be dramatically reduced.

Knowing that, how do we install recessed lighting (or electrical boxes for light fixtures or receptacles) without compromising the sound absorbtion performance of a wall or ceiling? Won't the fixtures create unwanted gaps? How do the professionals installers deal with that?

 ???

Professionals don't cut holes in their soundproof ceiling.

BJ Nash




skiaruba

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Re: How do I install recessed lighting on a soundproofed ceiling
« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2007, 11:15:17 PM »
I am about to soundproof the ceiling in my bedroom (mostly from impact noise, but also from airborn).  Currently, the structure is the floor above, 2x12 studs, and then my ceiling.  I am ripping down the drywall, stuffing cavities between studs with R19 Thermofiber, stapling MLV to studs, using the SSP sound clips and 7/8 25 gauge furring channel, attaching 5/8" Quietrock drywall, followed by 3/8" bead of green glue, then a regular 5/8" drywall.  Using a 3/8" bead of green glue around all perimeters.

Two questions:

1)  Am I missing anything / screwing up anything with this installation?  My big concern is impact noise.
2)  We currently have a ceiling fan installed and would like to keep it installed.  Also have sprinkler heads and duct work that itself does not come out of ceiling, but hangs from ceiling by skinny metal poles.  Can't do anything about the metal poles holding sprinkler heads and duct work, but don't have to put ceiling fan up (although I'd get considerable grief from my fiance for not putting it back up).  Any thoughts on whether the risk from ceiling fan shorting out ceiling is too much to even consider it?  Also, any thoughts on best way to isolate ceiling fan and metal poles so they don't short out ceiling?

Thanks for any thoughts.

Eric

johnbergstromslc

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Re: How do I install recessed lighting on a soundproofed ceiling
« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2007, 12:28:19 AM »
Well, a 'soundproof' ceiling should be an insulated, resiliently-hung, monolithic slab with no penetrations or gaps.  Any deviation from that is going to compromise performance. 

Your current plan sounds good, but Green Glue is not caulking - don't use it around the perimeter.  Use acoustical caulk (sold on this website). 

You could probably find a way to secure the ceiling fan to the drywall, like screwing it to a piece of plywood/OSB glued over the top sheet of drywall, just make sure you use an electrical box for the wiring.  And it might not hurt to use an additional SSP clip (or two) to carry the added weight. 

As for recessed lights, well, they are a bad idea.   

It's like you're building a dam across a river and then plan on deliberately punching big holes in the thing after it's built - it's gonna leak.  And your ceiling is gonna leak sound.  There's no good way to isolate them.  Avoid them, if at all possible.

 

anything