Author Topic: Keeping laundry noise in the laundry room  (Read 10322 times)

sanaka

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Keeping laundry noise in the laundry room
« on: April 11, 2007, 09:37:40 AM »
Hi.

I'd like some advice on further soundproofing a laundry room installation in a house I've been remodeling. I wish I'd found this great site before doing most of it! But it looks like I did OK so far.

The laundry room is on the driveway level, concrete floor, and its ceiling is the only common plane with the upstairs living space. On this ceiling 2x2 furring was nailed over the drywall into joists, resilient channel fastened on the furring, then two layers of 1/2" drywall, laminated with green glue, hung from the channel.

The rest of the room was not already drywalled. Between studs was filled with regular fiberglass insulation. The walls were also done with resilient channel across studs, then 2 layers of 1/2" drywall, laminated with green glue, hung from the channel. Space was left at all joints, then filled with acoustical caulk, including at the floor. So yes, the drywall enclosure is truly suspended.

The results are pretty amazing. There is very little laundry noise in the living space upstairs. The laundry is right under the living room and the refrigerator noise from the kitchen is actually quite a bit worse than the washer and dryer now. However, the residents of this house really value their quiet, and they might want even more soundproofing on the laundry if possible. The noise componenet still coming through from the laundry seems pretty low frequency, like a faint version of the rumble/roar from the dryer. The higher frequncy clicks and clacks and spin cycle sounds of normal laundry machinery are just not audible, or at least distinguishable as such. Inside the laundry room is loud and reverberant, and conversation is unpleasant even with no machines running. It makes me think the LF leakage may be due significantly to the reverberance - like how cabin gain makes a tiny subwoofer really loud in a car.

So the sort of vision that floated to my mind to adress this is: 3" pyramid or egg style foam over the whole ceiling, with bass traps in each upper corner of the room. The ceiling is the only unobstructed (by furniture and so on) plane in the room. It seems the foam would then quell the reverberance, especially at the common plane with the living space. The bass traps would additionally kill room bass resonances. I'm sure this would make the sound condition much nicer in the laundry room, but would it accomplish the important goal: quashing significantly more noise in the living space of the house?

Boy, that was longer to type than to think about! I sure would appreciate any insight from those with knowledge and experience. Thanks!

Peace,
Sanaka Thompson

Kona, Hawaii

johnbergstromslc

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Re: Keeping laundry noise in the laundry room
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2007, 09:28:22 PM »
Before you do any of that, get the washer and dryer on top of some kind of vibration isolation pad.  The remaining noise may be structure-borne.  Also make sure there's no rigid connection/contact to any walls/floor/doors. 

sanaka

  • Guest
Re: Keeping laundry noise in the laundry room
« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2007, 07:03:24 AM »
Sorry, should have mentioned that we're already using the Dimpled Vibration Isolation Pads. And yes, the machines are spaced away from the walls. There are other strategies I could/might employ as well, but for now I'm just trying to think out in front about the one I'm least sure of, LF absorbtion with foam panels. Thanks!

Peace,
Sanaka

johnbergstromslc

  • Guest
Re: Keeping laundry noise in the laundry room
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2007, 01:45:32 AM »
Bass traps in a laundry room???  Seems a bit over-the-top to me. 

Does the laundry room door have good seals? 

joel

  • Guest
Re: Keeping laundry noise in the laundry room
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2008, 10:20:20 PM »
If you use open cell poyfoam wedges or pryamids to absorb sound inside the laundry room you will need to check the low frequency NRV ratings for the highest absorption coefficient.  Use the 3-4" thick pyramids or check them out at http://www.soundproofing.org/sales/acousticfoams.htm 
Remember, open cell foam does not block ANY sound from going into/through the walls/ceiling/floor.  To both absorb AND block sound in a contained space use the closed cell vinyl nitrile foam - first product shown at  http://www.soundproofing.org/sales/prices.html 
while the NRC (.30) is not as high as open cell foams, sound goes in and doesn't come back out.  And the closed cell vinyl nitrile foam also has a 25 STC in thickness of 1/2" or better.