Author Topic: Man am I happy to find this Forum! Impact Noise in Condo !  (Read 3250 times)

alecop

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Man am I happy to find this Forum! Impact Noise in Condo !
« on: September 21, 2007, 07:09:00 PM »
Just moved into a concrete structure condominium.  I've got impact noise coming through my ceiling -- its driving me insane.

When I pulled my recessed lights to investigate, I found a metal plate (which I assume the cement floor sits on) , then  12-13inches of air(read that “nothing”) , and then 3.5 inches of yellow insulation across the top of my ceiling.  I know from the developers that an “absorption pad” of some kind is affixed under my upstairs neighbor’s floors…

A few questions please:

1.  I assume the “absorption pad” is meant to prevent impact noise from transmitting downward and the batt/ insulation is meant to prevent  airborne noise from going upward…Can I also assume the 12-13 inch air cavity between their floor and my ceiling is not helping anything…Is this correct?

2. Short of tearing down the entire ceiling (its a big space), can I assume that filling the empty cavity with more insulation would be step one and affixing a 5/8 inch ceiling drywall to my existing ceiling would be step two?

 3. Again short of tearing open my ceiling, is there any spray in options to fill that space…through the openings for my recessed lights? 

4. Would I need to fill the cavity top to bottom?  Not leaving any air space?

5. Any "Soundproofing" installers in the Boston Area? I need help addressing!

Thanks to all – this forum has some solid info.
A

bjnash

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Re: Man am I happy to find this Forum! Impact Noise in Condo !
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2007, 11:05:10 PM »
Just moved into a concrete structure condominium.  I've got impact noise coming through my ceiling -- its driving me insane.

When I pulled my recessed lights to investigate, I found a metal plate (which I assume the cement floor sits on) , then  12-13inches of air(read that “nothing”) , and then 3.5 inches of yellow insulation across the top of my ceiling.  I know from the developers that an “absorption pad” of some kind is affixed under my upstairs neighbor’s floors…

A few questions please:

1.  I assume the “absorption pad” is meant to prevent impact noise from transmitting downward and the batt/ insulation is meant to prevent  airborne noise from going upward…Can I also assume the 12-13 inch air cavity between their floor and my ceiling is not helping anything…Is this correct?

2. Short of tearing down the entire ceiling (its a big space), can I assume that filling the empty cavity with more insulation would be step one and affixing a 5/8 inch ceiling drywall to my existing ceiling would be step two?

 3. Again short of tearing open my ceiling, is there any spray in options to fill that space…through the openings for my recessed lights? 

4. Would I need to fill the cavity top to bottom?  Not leaving any air space?

5. Any "Soundproofing" installers in the Boston Area? I need help addressing!

Thanks to all – this forum has some solid info.
A


One problem is the recessed lighting as they will prove to be almost invisable to sound- another is the "Absorbing Pad" which means nothing to the sound.  The holes cut in your ceiling allow sound to come thru and the pad deos nothing, so you can see why you have the situation you have.

One part of the solution is to glue a real absorbing pad to the metal underside of the floor above.  A dampening pad like the closed cell foam found on the chart on the prices page at http://www.soundproofing.org/sales/prices.html  The thicker, the better. (At least 1" thick).  Then Cotton batting as shown at
http://www.soundproofing.org/infopages/natural_fiber.htm  Followed by closing off the holes cut for the recessed lighting and another layer of 5/8" firecode drywall over it all with Green Glue as shown at http://soundproofing.org/ggpages.htm 
(If you must have the recessed lighting, you could "soundproof" them with several coatings of sound deadening paint as shown at http://soundproofing.org/sales/liquid.htm  but doing away with the openings is best).

Another solution is to pay for soundproofing the neighbors floor from above, but that's another subject!

BJ Nash

 

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