Author Topic: Gypsum board  (Read 26936 times)

luispa

  • Guest
Re: Gypsum board
« Reply #15 on: March 28, 2008, 08:03:59 PM »
If you are sold on the idea of sandwich visco-elastic wallboard,here's an excerp from the website:

We now have the above green Insulation Tape in the 2' or 4' wide material (yes, that's 2 "Feet" and 4 "Feet" wide!), to cover the underside of an entire subfloor panel.  This will add dampening to the panel, reducing the resonant "boom" when walking on the floor.  All these tapes come with a peel off backing for easy, no-muss application. This also works well for drywall panels, too.  Info about floors.
 

This wide green Insulation tape is also available with peel-off adhesive on both sides! This for quickly adhering drywall panels together with a minimum of fasteners into the studding. (For instance, mating together 1/2" drywall with 3/8" with the tape inside is superior to using one thickness of 5/8" drywall).  It is a replacement for messy liquid "visco-elastic adhesives" that changes the sound characteristics of mated wall paneling.  This double-sided adhesive tape can also be used for quickly mounting thick foam to the wall without a liquid adhesive.  No muss, no fuss.  Mass loaded vinyl is usually too heavy for the tape, but a few staples here and there may be used.
BJ

Hi,

I'm from Argentina. I'm evaluating alternatives for soundproofing my practice room (I play the saxophone). It seems the visco-elastic is one of the best alternatives. At this time, the best alternative I found is (from the inside to the outside):

Drywall
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visco elastic glue or tape
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Drywall
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Resilient Channel
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Glass wool
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Original wall

It's impossible to get Green Glue or Green Insulation Tape in my country. What replacement alternative could I use? I'm asking for a more common glue. Otherwise, how perform the polyethylene closed-cell foam between two drywall boards as a dampening material?

Thank you very much in advance.

Mark Daveis

  • Guest
Re: Gypsum board
« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2008, 06:10:16 PM »
Use wall damp squares or build a brick wall so that it gives you plenty of mass and its cheap plus you dont have to mess about with any viscous glues.
Other products wont work as it has to be a specially made viscous compound. :)

johnbergstromslc

  • Guest
Re: Gypsum board
« Reply #17 on: March 29, 2008, 10:25:57 PM »
I would even advise to skip the viscoelastic layer altogether.  In your wall assembly, the resilient channel will be doing most of the work in killing the noise and a drywall interlayer won't add much, relative to the money you'd have to spend. 

But use as thick as possible drywall, 5/8" or 16 mm, and don't forget about sealing.  You can build the most elaborate wall setup, but if you skip the sealing you're wasting your time and money. 

luispa

  • Guest
Re: Gypsum board
« Reply #18 on: March 31, 2008, 02:36:30 PM »
Thanks for the replies. The original wall is a 3 inches brick wall. The new wall is supposed to be isolated from the old wall, fixed to door and ceiling using acoustic tape. Does this kind of work justify the use of Green Glue or similar?

Another question: What are the differences between using glass wool and mineral rock wool?

Thank you very much in advance.

Mark Daveis

  • Guest
Re: Gypsum board
« Reply #19 on: April 01, 2008, 10:49:20 PM »
The double wall design wil do most of the soundproofing so using GG will help a bit for LF and resonance problems but you may not need that level of soundproofing unless lots of bass noise.:)

joel

  • Guest
Re: Gypsum board
« Reply #20 on: May 23, 2008, 03:35:22 PM »
There are 4 basic soundproofing elements to keep in mind:
1. Decouple vibrating surfaces from the structurals (isolation tape, resilient channel, sound isolation clips)
2. Absorb and block sound within a contained space (inside wall/ceiling cavity)
3. Barrier remaining airborne sound (MLV)
4.Resonance - damp vibration between multiple layers of dry wall

Quiet rock uses a 15 year old formula "damping" compound that gets hard inside the assembly - I had a can of "Noise Killer" (that is the original name of the patented compound when the smart guys who started Quiet solutions bought the patents, materials, equipment, etc in Arizona and moved it to Silicon Valley) blow it's top last summer (it was real hot in my office) and get all over several sets of plans.  The material is hard in most places and has hardly any flex at all.  Another test sample of Green Glue between "stuff" that is almost 3 years old and more than fully cured is still sticky and flexible to the touch.  How's that for a "field test"
And when you use resilient channel (at least 85% of ALL installations I have either seen with my own eyes or spoken to users over the phone) have been "grounded out" for one reason or the other (installed wrong side up, run into structural at ends, dry wall screwed through to structural begind) - thus rendering it useless and actually increasing sound transmission.  The most common mistake with resilient channel is to use it on top of a layer of dry wall and then attach another sheet of dry wall on top.  For accurate info on this see  http://www.bkl.ca/building-construction/use-of-resilient-channel/
As for resonance - that is where Green Glue is really effective.  See the test results at  http://soundproofing.org/infopages/ggpages.htm

 

anything