Author Topic: Homosote ceiling installation  (Read 6275 times)

Lou Kingman

  • Guest
Homosote ceiling installation
« on: December 19, 2000, 12:11:57 AM »
I have hung 5/8" drywall on resilient channel on a ceiling before. (It wasn't until I was finished that I believed it would actually stay up!)
Now I have Homosote to install with 5/8" drywall.  1. Is it too much for the channel to hang both sheets from the channel on the ceiling?
2. What should the screw spacing be?
3. Is it important that the channel cross the wood joists?
How much difference would it make fastening the Homosote rigidly to the wood frame then mounting the channel and drywall onto it?
I apologize for any questions that mey be redundnat with epect to your FAQ. I just found your site, I will spend more time on it before my next job.
Thanks for your help,
LK

bjnash

  • Guest
Re: Homosote ceiling installation
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2000, 06:04:55 AM »
:  I have hung 5/8" drywall on resilient channel on a ceiling before. (It wasn't until I was finished that I believed it would actually stay up!)
:  Now I have Homosote to install with 5/8" drywall.  1. Is it too much for the channel to hang both sheets from the channel on the ceiling?
NO, just use more channel: 16"-18" ceneters
:  2. What should the screw spacing be?
12" is sufficient.  
:  3. Is it important that the channel cross the wood joists?
Yes, very important to minimise contact with the joists.  
:  How much difference would it make fastening the Homosote rigidly to the wood frame then mounting the channel and drywall onto it?
We don't recommend it.  (We can't comment on untried methods, just what we know works!)  
:  I apologize for any questions that mey be redundnat with epect to your FAQ. I just found your site, I will spend more time on it before my next job.
Most questions should be answered, any that aren't: ASK!  We're here to help!  Call 760 749 7049 Pacific time
:  Thanks for your help,
:  LK


Dave B

  • Guest
Re: Homosote ceiling installation
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2000, 05:36:02 PM »
Have your installations been existing ceilings, or over open floor joist?
Did you use any additional sound proofing material (besides the resilient channel and drywall)?
What was your experience with hanging the 5/8 drywall on resilient channel on a ceiling? Was it particularly difficult? Did you run into any unexpected problems?
I talked to an acoustic engineer who does commercial sound proofing. He said the majority of resilient channel installations he has seen have been done wrong, and therefore no more effective than just installing 5/8" drywall directly over the existing ceiling. Apparently it is hard to find people who can do the job correctly. He suggested that unless I have a lot of confidence in the person doing the job, I may want to consider just installing the 5/8" drywall right over the existing ceiling (same improvement as using incorrectly installed channel, but cheaper and easier).
Do you feel you got a "good" result? Do you feel the result is better than just using 5/8" drywall directly over the existing ceiling?
Did you space the channels at 16" or 24"?
Where did you buy the resilient channel?
Thanks in advance for your response.
Dave
:  I have hung 5/8" drywall on resilient channel on a ceiling before. (It wasn't until I was finished that I believed it would actually stay up!)
:  Now I have Homosote to install with 5/8" drywall.  1. Is it too much for the channel to hang both sheets from the channel on the ceiling?
:  2. What should the screw spacing be?
:  3. Is it important that the channel cross the wood joists?
:  How much difference would it make fastening the Homosote rigidly to the wood frame then mounting the channel and drywall onto it?
:  I apologize for any questions that mey be redundnat with epect to your FAQ. I just found your site, I will spend more time on it before my next job.
:  Thanks for your help,
:  LK


Lou Kingman

  • Guest
Re: Homosote ceiling installation
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2000, 03:45:59 PM »
To: Dave B
In response to your questions ...
 In remodeling rooms in a post and beam barn (about the worst situation for sound control) I ...
1. isolated a wood floor (3/4" plywood cross mounted to particle board underlayement = 1 1/5" total) from the joists using strips of 5/8" closed cell foam,
2. insulated the floor with R19  fibergalss,
3.  hung 5/8 drywall from C channel using 16" centers, crossing the joists, in the room below,
4. hung pine boards from C channel in the room above in similar fashion.
C Channel is stocked by my local Home Depot. So except for the foam, I used stock building materials and some compromises. At some point you must decide whther or not to tear the building down and build a atate of the art sound structure, or to apply modifications appropriate both to a budget and to maintaining the character of the original structure.
The above installation proved extremely effective in spite of high expectations.
In my current installation I'm limited by 2x4 walls, so I'm adding a layer of Homosote to the process in hopes of acheiving greater attenuation. We'll see.
I am also using the exisiting floor here, so shall apply a sound mat to it prior to carpet installation.
Hope this helps.


Jim Thorstad

  • Guest
Refer to www.homasote.com for install instructions
« Reply #4 on: January 26, 2001, 03:03:26 PM »
Guys,
I found detailed answers to your questions at Homasote's site. (it is spelled homasote, not homosote).
Be careful to actually get "real" resilient channels, I also saw things at Home Depot but they were not resilient channels, there are many other kinds of channels that don't work for soundproofing at all. A resilient channel is shaped like a straightened out "Z", not like a "U" if you get my idea. The fastening distance is based on panel thickness (weight) for walls and 16" OC for ceiling regardless of panel thickness.
The only thing missing from Homasote's site was actually using resilient channels behind their panels... they suggest fixing to joists or furring strips which doesn't sound ideal.
When attaching drywall over Homasote, they recommend using screws long enough to go into framing, not the channel alone. To some extent that defeats the purpose of soundproofing but it seems minor (you don't want the drywall falling down!).
I'd be interested in your experiences, I plan to soundproof a home woodworking shop which is underneath our family room.