Author Topic: Floor vibrations  (Read 4818 times)

ozznet

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Floor vibrations
« on: April 17, 2009, 10:38:46 PM »
I have a noisy neighbor in my condo and at night any structure borne noise/vibrations and bass from his sterio travel through the concrete floor up my bed posts and into my ear. I have managed to reduce the sound with white noise but I would like to know if I can stop the vibrations traveling up into my bed. I tried using your Vibration Isolation pads under the feet of the posts but it didn't really do much. is there anything else I could try and isn't going to cost a fortune. Keep in mind that I'm not trying to stop the sound in the room just the vibration into my bed.
Thanks

Randy S

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Re: Floor vibrations
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2009, 06:32:12 PM »
hmmm... well it sounds like the vibration and LF levels are higher then we thought, is your bed touching the wall???
Randy Sieg

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ozznet

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Re: Floor vibrations
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2009, 02:26:08 AM »
No it isn't.

Randy S

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Re: Floor vibrations
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2009, 05:33:12 PM »
well if the vibration and Bass is traveling up through the floor and into your bed then the vibration and Bass is also being remitted as airborne sound from your floor and walls....you might have to soundproof the entire floor to achieve more reduction.
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

jack2009

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Re: Floor vibrations
« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2009, 06:18:39 AM »
Floor vibration is up-and-down motion caused by forces applied directly to the floor by people or machinery, or by vibration transmitted through building columns, from other floors or from the ground.

The problems associated with floor vibration are not new. In 1828 Tredgold wrote "girders should always be made as deep as they can to avoid the inconvenience of not being able to move on the floor without shaking everything in the room."1 A simple floor deflection criterion (deflection of less than span/360 under distributed live load) has been used to control 'excessive shaking' for more than 100 years. But today, when longer spans, thinner floor decks, less structural damping (an absence of materials and components that absorb vibration energy), or the use of buildings for activities such as aerobics are responsible for vibration problems, this approach does not work. However, new guidelines that address and deal with these problems — based on what people perceive and find acceptable in terms of floor vibration — have recently been introduced
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