Author Topic: Acoustic Caulking  (Read 5229 times)

dude

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Acoustic Caulking
« on: December 19, 2000, 06:18:04 AM »
I have 1/2"x6" tounge and groove (like lapt) exterior redwood siding running horizontally on top of about 2 layers of tar paper on 2"x4"x16" OC studs. I am going to attempt to soundproof the room. Should I start by removing the tar paper with a blade from the inside, and caulk the seams before stuffing with insulation and installing the interior wallboard?

bjnash

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Re: Acoustic Caulking
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2000, 04:36:37 PM »
: I have 1/2"x6" tounge and groove (like lapt) exterior redwood siding running horizontally on top of about 2 layers of tar paper on 2"x4"x16" OC studs. I am going to attempt to soundproof the room. Should I start by removing the tar paper with a blade from the inside, and caulk the seams before stuffing with insulation and installing the interior wallboard?
No need to remove the tar paper as long as it's in good shape.  I would fit something like Homosote against it between the studs and seal that with non-hardening caulk.
"Stuff with insulation"?  If you plan on using fiberglas, it's is only of value for it's thermal qualities.  It has little or no practical value regardless of what Owens-Corning claims.  
I would cover the inside walls with 1/4" soundproofing mat, cover the studs with our barrier material "Flooring" and apply 5/8th inch firecode drywall on resilient channels.  See the link below for details and other options.


Fred Craven

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Re: Acoustic Caulking
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2000, 10:34:29 PM »
: : I have 1/2"x6" tounge and groove (like lapt) exterior redwood siding running horizontally on top of about 2 layers of tar paper on 2"x4"x16" OC studs. I am going to attempt to soundproof the room. Should I start by removing the tar paper with a blade from the inside, and caulk the seams before stuffing with insulation and installing the interior wallboard?
Just a point of order. In most cases you should not caulk your exterior siding--that is the horizonatal overlap part. Remember, your house needs to breath. If you caulk it up, then you will be trapping moisture on the inside.
Use calk on vertical joints, of course, and wherever needed to keep water from getting in.
Fred Craven