Author Topic: Isolating a bedroom from interior noise  (Read 4392 times)

aleph julie

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Isolating a bedroom from interior noise
« on: October 28, 2009, 12:39:27 AM »
We're in the process of buying a house, and my partner is very sensitive to noise when he's sleeping. The room we're planning to sleep in has three interior walls, and it's pretty protected from outside noise. Unfortunately, though, it's not at all protected from interior noise, and so if I get up before he does, he's going to hear me pretty much wherever I am in the house. So we're looking to do some soundproofing.

So, I have several questions, and though I've read through a bunch of posts on this forum, I haven't sorted out the answers yet. The first is that I don't know how much of the sound is traveling through the walls and how much is traveling through the floors or ceiling. If we just worked on the walls, is it reasonable to expect a significant improvement?

Second, I'm trying to figure out the most sensible way of soundproofing the walls. I had been thinking of using Green Glue and a second layer of drywall, which would be relatively quick and inexpensive. But I've heard mixed things about the effectiveness of that approach. We could also remove the existing drywall, install sound clips, and put up a new layer of drywall. Then there are the additional steps we could take to the latter approach, like adding a layer of mass-loaded vinyl. We wouldn't choose to go so far as to build a second wall. I guess what I wish for is a chart of the different reasonable approaches, with the STC ratings and the cost per square foot, but that's probably too much to hope for.

Third, I wanted to ask about soundproofing the floor. The concern is noise traveling into the room, not noise traveling out. There are two approaches I've considered. One is adding materials on top of the floor -- like mass-loaded vinyl, acoustical carpet pad, and then carpet. We don't particularly want carpet, though, so another approach would be to screw or glue drywall to the underside of the subfloor. Any comments on the effectiveness of those approaches?

Randy S

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Re: Isolating a bedroom from interior noise
« Reply #1 on: November 06, 2009, 04:37:15 PM »
Sorry for the late reply, This post would be best answered by calling me directly by phone.
The reason for this is due to the endless possible variables that could potentially play huge roles in the outcome of your soundproofing results.
examples: Soundproofing the walls and not replacing the hollow core bedroom door would yield very little overall results. Soundproofing a floor when the ceiling below has canned lighting, all these details play a huge role.
Also soundproofing for a drum room is far different then just soundproofing a dentist office. The level of soundproofing needed is determined by the source noise levels and the expectations of the client.
My contact info is below please contact me at your convenience.
Regards,
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

aleph julie

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Re: Isolating a bedroom from interior noise
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2009, 04:11:59 PM »
I did indeed call Randy, and he had a *lot* of useful information for me. We discussed the specifics of how my house is constructed, and he said that odds are that the floor is the biggest problem. My house is 70 years old, and it's built over a crawl space. The subfloors are planks, with hardwood above it. Essentially, they're acting as big drums. So the place to start is with them. Randy recommended attaching backer board, MLV and green glue under the subfloor, between the joists. Very useful advice!

Randy S

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Re: Isolating a bedroom from interior noise
« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2009, 05:13:01 PM »
Thank you for the post! Its very helpful to get all the feed back we can.

I just wanted to chime in here and make sure readers understand why that approach was recommended.

We always look at the source location first (best results) however, if you can't raise the height of the floor inside the home then you have to look at other ways to achieve similar results. The result from adding the dampener and mass below will greatly reduce the drum effect when walking through the house.
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040