Author Topic: Hi Fi turntable vibration problem: Solved!  (Read 4287 times)

Eugene Eckstam

  • Guest
Hi Fi turntable vibration problem: Solved!
« on: June 11, 2001, 04:16:19 PM »

I  contacted you all about mid May about a Hi Fi turntable vibration
problem:  walking past the 200++ pound cabinet caused the needle to jump
tracks.  I am sending feedback to those of you who were so kind to respond
!   I appreciate that, and so do your regular customers.
I tried the cork-neoprene "sandwich" machinery vibration pad sold
by  Grainger Supply.   A 3" pad under each corner did nothing!   Placing
only about 1 inch  of a corner of each pad in each corner did help some,
but not enough.   I checked the catalog and found that those pads will
cover 10  - 60 psi.     I had about  55 lbs in each corner  = 14 psi.   It
was like a fly sitting on a small tree branch - no bending.    So I figured
I needed something softer..
The base of the cabinet is a rectangle of 3" x 3/4" wood with the narrow
edge on the  carpet or pad.
One suggestion was to put a couple layers of carpet under cabinet, but that
was of little help.
I found a door mat at Menard's  - a supply store like Home Depot, Lowe's
and others.  It was a black, I think neoprene rubber mat with 1" holes and
only about 1/4" of rubber between   - more at junctions of rows.    It gave
under my heal and sort of bounced a bit.
The whole mat helped more than other trials.  I cut the mat by dividing it
in half in each direction - then tested by pulling the mat away from the
corners of the cabinet till only about a 3" square was under each
corner.    Problem was almost solved.
I cut a strip of 6 holes for each of 2 pieces.   I placed one under the
back near each corner near the wall (which did not bounce.)  The third
piece was a triangle with 6 holes on a side and that was placed in the
MIDDLE of the front of the cabinet.   The row of 6 holes solved the trick !!!!
Reason  (I think)    =   the joists in the floor run parallel to the front
of the cabinet, which is to one side of center, perhaps 1/4 distance from
one end.   I think the torque not only lifted the cabinet, but also rotated
it back and forth - like a teeter-totter.   The center pad allows only up
and down motion.   I may be wrong in theory,  but this tripod system is
working just fine.
I hope you may profit from this feedback.
Thanks very much for your responses and best wishes for your futures.
Eugene Eckstam
Mpls MN

bjnash

  • Guest
Re: Hi Fi turntable vibration problem: Solved!
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2001, 04:20:02 PM »
:
: I  contacted you all about mid May about a Hi Fi turntable vibration
: problem:  walking past the 200++ pound cabinet caused the needle to jump
: tracks.  I am sending feedback to those of you who were so kind to respond
: !   I appreciate that, and so do your regular customers.
: I tried the cork-neoprene "sandwich" machinery vibration pad sold
: by  Grainger Supply.   A 3" pad under each corner did nothing!   Placing
: only about 1 inch  of a corner of each pad in each corner did help some,
: but not enough.   I checked the catalog and found that those pads will
: cover 10  - 60 psi.     I had about  55 lbs in each corner  = 14 psi.   It
: was like a fly sitting on a small tree branch - no bending.    So I figured
: I needed something softer..
: The base of the cabinet is a rectangle of 3" x 3/4" wood with the narrow
: edge on the  carpet or pad.
: One suggestion was to put a couple layers of carpet under cabinet, but that
: was of little help.
: I found a door mat at Menard's  - a supply store like Home Depot, Lowe's
: and others.  It was a black, I think neoprene rubber mat with 1" holes and
: only about 1/4" of rubber between   - more at junctions of rows.    It gave
: under my heal and sort of bounced a bit.
: The whole mat helped more than other trials.  I cut the mat by dividing it
: in half in each direction - then tested by pulling the mat away from the
: corners of the cabinet till only about a 3" square was under each
: corner.    Problem was almost solved.
: I cut a strip of 6 holes for each of 2 pieces.   I placed one under the
: back near each corner near the wall (which did not bounce.)  The third
: piece was a triangle with 6 holes on a side and that was placed in the
: MIDDLE of the front of the cabinet.   The row of 6 holes solved the trick !!!!
: Reason  (I think)    =   the joists in the floor run parallel to the front
: of the cabinet, which is to one side of center, perhaps 1/4 distance from
: one end.   I think the torque not only lifted the cabinet, but also rotated
: it back and forth - like a teeter-totter.   The center pad allows only up
: and down motion.   I may be wrong in theory,  but this tripod system is
: working just fine.
: I hope you may profit from this feedback.
: Thanks very much for your responses and best wishes for your futures.
: Eugene Eckstam
: Mpls MN
Thanks very much for sharing this with us!  One thought:  The turntable itself is spring mounted, but for transport there is a way to "hard-lock" it to the mounting frame.  If this is done and was not unlocked, could it cause your sensitivity problem?


Eugene Eckstam

  • Guest
Re: Hi Fi turntable vibration problem: Solved!
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2001, 08:24:38 PM »
: :
: : I  contacted you all about mid May about a Hi Fi turntable vibration
: : problem:  walking past the 200++ pound cabinet caused the needle to jump
: : tracks.  I am sending feedback to those of you who were so kind to respond
: : !   I appreciate that, and so do your regular customers.
: : I tried the cork-neoprene "sandwich" machinery vibration pad sold
: : by  Grainger Supply.   A 3" pad under each corner did nothing!   Placing
: : only about 1 inch  of a corner of each pad in each corner did help some,
: : but not enough.   I checked the catalog and found that those pads will
: : cover 10  - 60 psi.     I had about  55 lbs in each corner  = 14 psi.   It
: : was like a fly sitting on a small tree branch - no bending.    So I figured
: : I needed something softer..
: : The base of the cabinet is a rectangle of 3" x 3/4" wood with the narrow
: : edge on the  carpet or pad.
: : One suggestion was to put a couple layers of carpet under cabinet, but that
: : was of little help.
: : I found a door mat at Menard's  - a supply store like Home Depot, Lowe's
: : and others.  It was a black, I think neoprene rubber mat with 1" holes and
: : only about 1/4" of rubber between   - more at junctions of rows.    It gave
: : under my heal and sort of bounced a bit.
: : The whole mat helped more than other trials.  I cut the mat by dividing it
: : in half in each direction - then tested by pulling the mat away from the
: : corners of the cabinet till only about a 3" square was under each
: : corner.    Problem was almost solved.
: : I cut a strip of 6 holes for each of 2 pieces.   I placed one under the
: : back near each corner near the wall (which did not bounce.)  The third
: : piece was a triangle with 6 holes on a side and that was placed in the
: : MIDDLE of the front of the cabinet.   The row of 6 holes solved the trick !!!!
: : Reason  (I think)    =   the joists in the floor run parallel to the front
: : of the cabinet, which is to one side of center, perhaps 1/4 distance from
: : one end.   I think the torque not only lifted the cabinet, but also rotated
: : it back and forth - like a teeter-totter.   The center pad allows only up
: : and down motion.   I may be wrong in theory,  but this tripod system is
: : working just fine.
: : I hope you may profit from this feedback.
: : Thanks very much for your responses and best wishes for your futures.
: : Eugene Eckstam
: : Mpls MN
: Thanks very much for sharing this with us!  One thought:  The turntable itself is spring mounted, but for transport there is a way to "hard-lock" it to the mounting frame.  If this is done and was not unlocked, could it cause your sensitivity problem?
:

All springs were working fine = first thing checked and adjusted.

 

anything