Author Topic: Sound Sensitivity  (Read 4049 times)

bjnash

  • Guest
Sound Sensitivity
« on: June 25, 2001, 04:13:30 PM »
After talking with many people and seeing some of the posts here on the forum, it might be appropriate to explain what we think we know about sound sensitivity and what can be done about it.
Some individuals seem to have a unique sensitivity to sound- repetitive sound is annoying but even low levels of sound that another person can easily ignore seems to aggravate the situation and give them little rest.
Sound control headsets appear to be far more effective than earplugs, even though they are not easy to sleep with.
For those who can't wear these contraptions, a masking sound from white noise generators may give some relief.  (Tune your FM radio between stations to see if this hiss will help, if so, you can purchase white noise generators).
Try not to keep your environment completely silent, have some sound going on, otherwise the ear seems to "turn up" it's listening and becomes susceptable to unexpected noise, loud or not.
Before using earplugs or headsets, go to an extremely quiet place to put them on, linger there a few minutes before putting them on.  This seems to set a level that helps the ear reject sound that might normally come through.  (We don't know why this works, but it seems to).
Some people seem to be helped with this sesitivity condition by their doctors, other not.  It would be worth a visit to see.
If the noise is repetitive, like a vibration of a ceiling fan, (not barking dogs), noise cancelling headsets will help.  We will have some for sale on the website as soon as we finish testing different ones.  Email us if you need some now.
If you have a condition like this and have found sonme relief, let us know by posting here!


Nick Halloway

  • Guest
Re: Sound Sensitivity
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2001, 02:28:43 AM »
Sinus problems can cause sound sensitivity.
: After talking with many people and seeing some of the posts here on the forum, it might be appropriate to explain what we think we know about sound sensitivity and what can be done about it.
: Some individuals seem to have a unique sensitivity to sound- repetitive sound is annoying but even low levels of sound that another person can easily ignore seems to aggravate the situation and give them little rest.
: Sound control headsets appear to be far more effective than earplugs, even though they are not easy to sleep with.
: For those who can't wear these contraptions, a masking sound from white noise generators may give some relief.  (Tune your FM radio between stations to see if this hiss will help, if so, you can purchase white noise generators).
: Try not to keep your environment completely silent, have some sound going on, otherwise the ear seems to "turn up" it's listening and becomes susceptable to unexpected noise, loud or not.
: Before using earplugs or headsets, go to an extremely quiet place to put them on, linger there a few minutes before putting them on.  This seems to set a level that helps the ear reject sound that might normally come through.  (We don't know why this works, but it seems to).
: Some people seem to be helped with this sesitivity condition by their doctors, other not.  It would be worth a visit to see.
: If the noise is repetitive, like a vibration of a ceiling fan, (not barking dogs), noise cancelling headsets will help.  We will have some for sale on the website as soon as we finish testing different ones.  Email us if you need some now.
: If you have a condition like this and have found sonme relief, let us know by posting here!



JJ McCraty

  • Guest
Re: Sound Sensitivity
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2002, 08:16:00 PM »
would like more on either good earplugs or headsets for noise cancelling. and a ood phones headset that also blocks out other sound.

 

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