Author Topic: Soundproofing the Backyard  (Read 20305 times)

saleem145

  • Guest
Soundproofing the Backyard
« on: July 03, 2011, 11:07:01 PM »
I am sure you have heard this one before -- just bought a home near the highway -- quiet inside the home but noisy backyard. I have been researching ways I can reduce sound.

It seems building a fence with MLV will help. I would love to hear from anyone who has done this and how much it helped?? I would be willing to put up something eight feet high by three hundred feet. My question is also what is the best way to go about constructing the fence -- do two layers of MLV on opposite sides help significantly to warrant the additional cost....putting something in between the two layers help for example?? I am just planning to build a frame from wood and then nail in the MLV....

Also I am curious to hear on what is the latest with active noise cancellation....

Randy S

  • Senior Soundproofing Technical Specialist
  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
    • Super Soundproofing Co
Re: Soundproofing the Backyard
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2011, 06:42:46 PM »
forget noise cancellation for outside freeway noise...you can do white noise to help reduce the perception of freeway noise (like waterfalls and pool pumps etc...)
When dealing with noise abatement walls there a few factors involved. distance from source to wall to receiver, and height of wall and mass of wall to dictate shadow zone and diffracted path.

to be continued next post.


You can contact me directly if you need further explanation.



Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

Randy S

  • Senior Soundproofing Technical Specialist
  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
    • Super Soundproofing Co
Re: Soundproofing the Backyard
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2011, 06:42:58 PM »
The easiest way to explain this would imagine a sea wall. if the wall is big enough and strong enough to push the wave back before it grows larger than the wall you achieve the best reduction. If the wave grows bigger than the wall before it reaches it than some of the wave is pushed back and the remaining crest of the wave crashes over the wall. Where that wave lands is the end of the shadow zone (the quiet zone).
That value of sound that lands in the yard would now be the determined value of reduction which can gain additional reduction based on doubling the distance from wall to receiver.
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

Randy S

  • Senior Soundproofing Technical Specialist
  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
    • Super Soundproofing Co
Re: Soundproofing the Backyard
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2011, 03:24:20 PM »
We have done MLV exterior walls that have delivered enough reduction to justify the cost. Just remember that location and height is what truly dictates the noise reduction.
Call me and we can discuss.

Randy S.
760-752-3030 ext 104
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

whatismisophonia

  • Guest
Re: Soundproofing the Backyard
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2012, 12:47:24 PM »
im a little lost in interpretation... are you saying its better to be closer or further away from the barrier?  the wave analogy makes me think that the shadow zone is the quiet zone, but you said doubling the distance increases reduction?  :-\

Randy S

  • Senior Soundproofing Technical Specialist
  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
    • Super Soundproofing Co
Re: Soundproofing the Backyard
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2012, 05:56:14 PM »
the shadow zone is the quiet zone, but also remember every time you increase distance from source you also get a reduction in sound.
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

whatismisophonia

  • Guest
Re: Soundproofing the Backyard
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2012, 04:01:27 AM »
so then, if i were just outside the shadow zone, it'd be slightly louder, yet, if i were a ways away from it, it'd be quieter then. Where is the best place for a wall?  Lets say that in two different scenarios a back patio area the same distance from the road and there is minimal slope.  In one scenario the wall is close enough that the patio is in the shadow zone, and in the other scenario, the wall is right at the road (as close as code will alow). Since the total distance is the same either way, i would assume that the shadow zone would be better. Also, what effect would a slope have?  I would assume that if the road was at a downward slope from the patio, sound would be less of an issue because there would be more ground surface area to absorb the sound (the wall would be best further from source to take advantage of the rise regardless, i would assume).

Randy S

  • Senior Soundproofing Technical Specialist
  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
    • Super Soundproofing Co
Re: Soundproofing the Backyard
« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2012, 04:29:06 PM »
Yes it is amazing to experience in the field, once you leave the shadow zone the wall does seem to disappear even though you have caused a reduction in sound.
For your scenarios, that is the basis of location and topography, if the road is below and you are elevated, it tends to be less of a reduction than if you where level or below the road.
Therefore, level and below you would tend to put the wall as close to the road as possible and as high as possible. Closer to source better the reduction the faster you reduce sound.
But,If you are elevated above the road or to far to place the wall at the road then you would most likely try to put the home or patio in the shadow zone therefore placing the wall closer to the house, you could also use the roof top as a means to extend the shadow zone.  You must be careful when you do this because if you miss extending the zone you can actually increase the problem by creating a standing wave between the wall and the home.
 
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

whatismisophonia

  • Guest
Re: Soundproofing the Backyard
« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2012, 11:10:18 AM »
I want to smack myself in the head and say DUH  ::).  im not sure why i was intuitively thinking that being higher up would be better; obviously if you are higher than the road you are going to get hit with the full force of the compression, not to mention that since the ground would absorb more energy, you would be more apt to feel vibration up through the foundation (on top of what youd feel from the wave directly hiting the house).  Too bad Thomas Edison's poured contrete house idea didnt work so well; that would be the fix for that scenario, considering that decoupling was all of the sudden a nonissue.

But anyway, I'm wondering about standing waves; isnt that sort of like noise canceling where two waves meet and they cancel eachother out?  Why are standing waves an issue?

Randy S

  • Senior Soundproofing Technical Specialist
  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
    • Super Soundproofing Co
Re: Soundproofing the Backyard
« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2012, 05:28:10 PM »
Standing waves can either cancel a frequency or increase a frequency depending on parallel surfaces and node location.

If you want to get technical you can e-mail me direct, lets try to keep it simple on the forum.
We don't want to confuse people. :)
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040