Author Topic: Child's Bedroom Beneith Master Bedroom  (Read 4825 times)

Sladering

  • Guest
Child's Bedroom Beneith Master Bedroom
« on: February 21, 2012, 04:57:39 PM »
Bought a house where one room in the basement is finished as a bedroom and it happens to sit right below the master bedroom. Worried about sound traveling between rooms, we had the joist space filled with blown-in insulation (looks like old newspaper?) prior to moving in. After living in the house for 6 months, the sound transmission is a major issue. Music from below is heard in the master, and dogs playing in the master are heard in the bedroom below.

I am reluctant to modify the ceiling in the basement bedroom since the there are supply and return ducts that traverse the room, so the ceiling is not flat but instead conforms to the duct work. Seems like this makes floating the ceiling kind of hard. Plus a huge mess when the drywall is removed and the blown-in insulation spills out.

So what can I do from the top side? The room is carpeted now, but will eventually be remade into an office with hardwood floors in a few years. I'm willing to pull up the carpet and underlayment to get at the joists. But floating the floor may not work because raising the floor by 1.5 inches could be an issue with the sliding glass door that goes to a deck off the master.

I'm thinking of filling the joist space with a better insulator, adding a thin damper to the tops of the joists, then a heavy underlayment over the joists, then MLV over the underlayment, then pad and carpet. Can the same underlayment and MLV be used for the future hardwood floor?

Thanks for the advice, wish I had found this forum before we moved in!!

Randy S

  • Senior Soundproofing Technical Specialist
  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
    • Super Soundproofing Co
Re: Child's Bedroom Beneith Master Bedroom
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2012, 08:34:01 PM »
your right on track, I would just pull carpet and padding and use our Mass loaded vinyl with closed cell foam beneath the padding and carpet..

stick with carpet, the underlayment can NOT be used with hardwood flooring..

The reason I recommend only this approach and nothing more is because the "Flanking noise" of the walls will still be in play.

If you where to soundproof the walls then it would be worth doing more..
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

whatismisophonia

  • Guest
Re: Child's Bedroom Beneith Master Bedroom
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2012, 03:51:22 PM »
In terms of the music, yeah, i can imagine there would be flanking noise.  However, when considering dogs playing around (have that problem myself directly over my head) and the fact that you may still end up installing a hardwood floor anyway, you should still consider floating the floor for impact noise, even if you cant float it but a fraction of an inch; you already have a decent air gap in the joists, now what you need is decoupling and mass.  by installing padding on top of the joists and adding mlv, you seem to be on the same page.  However, bear in mind that when you nail or screw through the underlayment into the joists, you are shorting the system; in which case, you no longer have much of any decoupling, just dampening.  Check out this post for an idea i have about floating a floor; hasnt been answered yet:  http://supersoundproofing.com/forum/index.php/topic,2329.msg9457.html#msg9457 
Basicly, you need to find some way to float the floor if you're going to do hardwood (there's a bedroom under you after all).  If the sliding door is still an issue, just drop the floor just before the door, and make sure you keep at least a slender airgap between the drop the the rest of the floor and fill it with acousitc caulking; there's always a fix, just be creative.  The only other thing you could do is adopt the japanese approach and wear slippers in your at-home office.  Also, make sure you have soft furnature and add some area rugs.

Randy S

  • Senior Soundproofing Technical Specialist
  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
    • Super Soundproofing Co
Re: Child's Bedroom Beneith Master Bedroom
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2012, 06:22:11 PM »
flanking noise happens with impact as well. not just music.....

refer over to my response on your earlier post.
http://supersoundproofing.com/forum/index.php/topic,2329.0.html
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

Sladering

  • Guest
Re: Child's Bedroom Beneith Master Bedroom
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2012, 07:22:07 PM »
Hi Randy,

Thanks for the reply. From the links you and the other gentleman provided, it seems like the advice is to also put down a pad under the MLV.

"The reason you have not had a better reduction in sound is because you have placed the system down incorrectly. What you need to do is place a 1/4" or 1/2" layer of padding underneath the MLV barrier. This will decouple the Barrier from the hard surface and allow it to perform as a sound Barrier... when MLV is flat on a hard surface it will not perform to its full potential."

Is this right or it not worth doing because of the flanking noise through the walls? I think that post also mentioned using metal tape over the seams between the underlayment and also on the MLV seams, and to calk the MLV to the walls to form a seal with the MLV. Are these right also?

I'm also interested if there are better forms of underlayment, like 440 SoundBarrier from Homasote. Worth the price or not?

Thanks very much for the advice!

Randy S

  • Senior Soundproofing Technical Specialist
  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 819
    • Super Soundproofing Co
Re: Child's Bedroom Beneith Master Bedroom
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2012, 09:18:56 PM »
Use our composite of Mass loaded vinyl with closed cell foam underlayment and you will not need the pad underneath the MLV.
Also keep in mind that our special closed cell foam increases the overall STC value of the material which carpet padding will not do.

Yes it is worth doing, even with a flanking issue. Which you might not have depending on low frequency or impact to the walls.

And yes the seam tape and caulking is required for proper installation.
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

whatismisophonia

  • Guest
Re: Child's Bedroom Beneith Master Bedroom
« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2012, 09:18:25 AM »
flanking noise happens with impact as well. not just music.....

refer over to my response on your earlier post.
http://supersoundproofing.com/forum/index.php/topic,2329.0.html

I couldnt see anything you mentioned about flanking noise happening with impact...  Although, i could imagine that hard soles on a hard floor would produce enough airborn noise to make the walls vibrate; in which case, i wonder if a possible fix would be to install lots of acoustic panels hidden by posters and art pictures/paintings.

 

anything