Author Topic: Building a Soundproof Isolation Booth / Chamber for Sax Practice - Lots of Ques  (Read 4483 times)

jodaboda

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I'm planning to build a soundproof(-ish) practice booth for playing sax. Approximate dimensions 4'x4' (because drywall comes in 4' widths, and that's a good size given what I have available), by probably 6-1/2' high. The apartment is already pretty good (old building, not new cheap drywall construction). I'm looking to really focus on 100hz-1000hz. I think much below that isn't a problem with a sax, and above that will be attenuated by the apartment walls anyway.

The general construction will be 2x4s and 5/8 drywall.

First question is about the base. I'll have a carpet inside, then below that MDF (plywood, similar, etc.), then a frame of 2x4 with loose MLV for LF absorption and blocking. Below that, more MDF. Is this a good layering system? Should I have closed-cell foam at the bottom, or rubber spacers, casters or something else? (to prevent resonating the floor)

I think that since there will be the huge air gap (from the booth to the wall of the apartment), it's probably overkill to do Green Glue and two layers of drywall, right?

Door will be a 24" fire door from Home Depot for around $100. Weather sealing or whatever necessary to make it airtight.

"Roof" will be MDF, then a frame of 2x4s, and MDF on top of that. Exhaust system will be in the 2x4 frame. Enough angles/baffling to prevent too many highs from escaping, and since the lows try to go straight through, the MDF will block it. Should I put drywall on there? MLV? Fine as-is?

Sax is somewhat directional; sound comes out straight forward, up, and to the right. Should I put extra soundproofing material in those walls (forward and right)?

I'm planning on having just the basics done soon (base, frame, drywall, and top). I'll tack my Producer's Choice blankets inside, but otherwise keep pretty bare. This leaves me the opportunity to, later on, fill the walls with 703 and possibly tack on a layer of MLV inside. I spend a minimum of money on it now, but have an upgrade path.

Any foreseeable weak points?

Also, as a general construction question, should I put foam or something between the drywall and 2x4s, or is this not doing anything since they are screwed together anyway? Should I screw them together then use acoustic sealer/silicone on the inside seam?

Any input appreciated! This is a pretty big project for me, but I'm really looking forward to it...

Randy S

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Ok your on the right track, if your going to use mass loaded vinyl than use it for all 6 sides of the room..you want to keep your bubble equal.

Once you've built the room you can always add a second layer with green glue at a later date if you need to.

I wouldn't use the mdf inside the room use MLV and drywall. your not building a speaker box..

Isolation padding tape will help and its cheap. Use it.

Make sure you seal this thing like a fish tank! no leaks any where.
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

jodaboda

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Thanks!  Do you have an opinion on attaching the MLV stiff/taut to the drywall or 2x4s, vs. having it hang "limp" (just tacking it on the inside at the top) so it works to absorb some LF rather than just reflecting it?

Randy S

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you will have to email me direct in order for me to send the instruction sheet.

Randy@soundproofing.org

Randy S.



Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

johnbergstromslc

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Thanks!  Do you have an opinion on attaching the MLV stiff/taut to the drywall or 2x4s, vs. having it hang "limp" (just tacking it on the inside at the top) so it works to absorb some LF rather than just reflecting it?

You don't want it completely limp, you can attach it to the studs as well as the top & bottom plates, but you absolutely don't want it taut.  It should be a bit 'loose' so it can deflect and absorb sound energy.