Author Topic: removing fiberglass batting from dishwasher  (Read 3230 times)

llvora

  • Guest
removing fiberglass batting from dishwasher
« on: January 12, 2013, 07:51:38 PM »
I have a Bosch dishwasher, stainless steel door. 
I'd like to replace the fiberglass batting for allergy reasons.  I've become very allergic to dog dander, I had my dog in the house for a long time so anything like batting is now a reservoir of dander.
I'm not bothered by the dishwasher noise, but I don't want to make it any noisier.
So I'd like to take the batting out and replace it with soundproofing that's as good or better.  The fiberglass batting around the sides of the dishwasher is 3/4" thick, and there's also thin batting inside the door.
I have 3/32" thick mass-loaded vinyl, and 1/4" thick acoustic closed-cell foam.
So what would be equivalent to the batting for soundproofing purposes?  (I read your page on dishwasher soundproofing)
I'm not sure how to take the dishwasher apart, there are metal panels on the sides covering the batting and I'm not sure how to get at the batting inside the door.  The batting on the back and top is exposed. 

johnbergstromslc

  • Guest
Re: removing fiberglass batting from dishwasher
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2013, 10:40:44 PM »
Don't do it...  You'll void your warranty and won't make much of a difference.  Buried underneath the counter, it's not absorbing much dander.  There's infinitely more in the carpet, furniture and drapes...

llvora

  • Guest
Re: removing fiberglass batting from dishwasher
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2013, 11:11:32 PM »
Oh, it has dirt in it alright.  The back is next to a heater vent and exposed, and dust puffs out when I move it.  I could just replace the exposed parts of the fiberglass batting for now, I guess, and leave the rest till later if I still have allergy problems. 
But the same question applies to the exposed parts of the batting:  what that I have is equivalent to 3/4" fiberglass batting for sound control?
The dishwasher is out of warranty. 
Yes, I've cleaned up many reservoirs of dander in my house. 

johnbergstromslc

  • Guest
Re: removing fiberglass batting from dishwasher
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2013, 03:47:05 PM »
Oh, it has dirt in it alright.  The back is next to a heater vent and exposed, and dust puffs out when I move it.  I could just replace the exposed parts of the fiberglass batting for now, I guess, and leave the rest till later if I still have allergy problems. 
But the same question applies to the exposed parts of the batting:  what that I have is equivalent to 3/4" fiberglass batting for sound control?
The dishwasher is out of warranty. 
Yes, I've cleaned up many reservoirs of dander in my house.

In that case, wrapping the body of the dishwasher with the composite MLV+foam product (sold on this site, normally used as carpet underlayment) with the MLV on the outside will probably work better than fiberglass.  Give Randy a call on Monday.  He can give you tips on install as well.

llvora

  • Guest
Re: removing fiberglass batting from dishwasher
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2013, 06:27:19 PM »
I'd rather use what I have around, which is a good deal of mass-loaded vinyl and 1/4" acoustic foam. 
Does it matter for sound purposes to have soundproofing on the back of it?  There's about 1/2" thick fiberglass batting there now.   
If so, how would I attach the mass-loaded vinyl to the back of the dishwasher?  Do you say put it on the outside so that it won't accumulate dust?  The closed-cell foam shouldn't be an allergen reservoir. 
Small openings do accumulate dust over time, even if no air is being blown past them.  My bathroom cabinet was mounted with a small opening to the wall, and that's furry with dust.

johnbergstromslc

  • Guest
Re: removing fiberglass batting from dishwasher
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2013, 12:10:03 AM »
You'll have to see what the dishwasher has on it now, after removing the fiberglass.  A lot of higher-end models have a thick rubber sheet or coating tightly wrapping the steel box to deaden the resonance.  If that is the case, then it would be more effective to wrap it with foam first, then the MLV, for a kind of insulated 'double wall' construction.

To adhere the MLV, overlap the seam by 6" or so, and use contact cement (after roughing up the mating surfaces) to give it a good bond.  Also, I like to seal the seams with 3" foil tape, as a backup.