Author Topic: Help for someone with tinnitus and a noisy rental  (Read 4669 times)

Cryptic

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Help for someone with tinnitus and a noisy rental
« on: January 16, 2013, 03:05:00 AM »
I'm a music major going to school on a scholarship and after the roof off our current house in New Jersey was blown off my Hurricane Sandy, we moved to a single family rental a few minutes away. My ears are extremely sensitive and the particular town we live in is big on having trucks whizzing by at 40-50 mph on a 25 mph residential road at all hours of the day and now a freight train a few blocks down the street seems to be becoming more frequent. Often times we are woken in the middle of the night by someone on a motorcycle or a truck speeding by our house and can feel the vibrations and hear much of the noise outside. Given the amount of money we've had to find out of thin air just to move, we don't have a lot lying around to purchase expensive sound proof windows but my patience is really running thin and we don't want to move again. I feel like I'm being attacked by sound all the time and it's driving me a bit insane.

Does anyone here know of a way to sound proof at least a few windows in a one story house in an economical way? I've taken some classes in sound engineering and all we have up now are blackout curtains in the bedrooms. Is there anything I could pick up at home depot or something that doesn't go over $100/per window like I've seen online that would be effective? Obviously since it's a rental it would be great if it wasn't permanent, but at this point as long as it's not ridiculous I'm willing to try it.

Thanks so much for any help you guys can give.

Randy S

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Re: Help for someone with tinnitus and a noisy rental
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2013, 06:35:01 PM »
The best you can do is our magnaseal system.
http://soundproofing.org/infopages/magnetseal_windows.htm

If you can not afford this system then you can use mass loaded vinyl stapled to the window box and sealed with caulk or tape..

http://www.supersoundproofingsales.com/Mass-Loaded-Vinyl-4W-per-foot/productinfo/09-00005-48/

Randy Sieg

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whatismisophonia

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Re: Help for someone with tinnitus and a noisy rental
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2013, 01:07:19 AM »
He asks for "economy" when spending his money moving after his old house was blown away by a hurricane, and you recommend MLV... 

If you're wanting to just plug your windows, one thing you can do is buy some drywall and some soundboard (5/8th inch type-X drywall is best, though the plug will be pretty heavy).  The soundboard is cut to preciecly squeeze into your window cavity, and the drywall is cut slightly shorter on all sides than the window cavity.  Screw one piece of drywall onto each side of the soundboard, and attach some cheap handles to one side so that you can remove the plug fairly easily when you want to.

"I feel like I'm being attacked by sound all the time and it's driving me a bit insane." 

If anyone knows how you feel, it's me.  For me, ANY sound that bleeds through my walls at all triggers extreme irritation and anxiety because of my own neurological condition.  I've gone through exhaustive efforts to soundproof my entire bed room, and it's just ONGOING.  It feels like a 10 year war.  Sound is such a damned beast, and so many freaking people just don't seem to care.  Wait a minute, this isn't my support group... sorry.  That one's on yahoo.


Randy S

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Re: Help for someone with tinnitus and a noisy rental
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2013, 03:49:51 PM »
Yeah go ahead and follow this " experts" advise and let us know how it works for you!
The second he screws the drywall in to the wall structure you just made him another speaker...been there seen that one first hand many times..bad advise..
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

whatismisophonia

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Re: Help for someone with tinnitus and a noisy rental
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2013, 06:43:16 PM »
I never said to screw the drywall to the wall structure, as I am aware that for maximum effect, the plug should be decoupled from the opposite window as much as possible.  But even if I had suggested it, it would only mean that the window could be no more decoupled, and thereby 'soundproofed' than the wall itself.  I have witnessed this first hand, as I have a window plug made of 3/8" inch hardibacker which I screwed into the rough framing opposite of the window.  It's as effective as the wall.  Also, the technique I mentioned in the last post was not actually of my own design; it was put forth by an "expert" (you're not the only one) and it makes sense to me:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2ReTr9Syqg

p.s. i forgot that he recommended panel adhesive, not screws; though I don't know how much difference, if any it would make.  The main purpose of the soundboard is to create the seal; to the best of my research, it's decoupling qualities are questionable. 


Randy S

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Re: Help for someone with tinnitus and a noisy rental
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2013, 06:56:30 PM »
The way you did your plug is a far better approach than this video you refer to. Either way you do it, it has to have a better seal than just the soundboard or any rigid material making contact to the window box...even if you use some basic pvc tape to do it...it would be far easier than trying to make a perfect cut with the rigid material..
We both can agree the concept is the same no matter how we approach it..decouple and add mass. Which yields a dead airspace and maximizes reduction.
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

Cryptic

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Re: Help for someone with tinnitus and a noisy rental
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2013, 01:14:27 AM »
Hey guys,

Thanks for the responses...a lot to take in.

Essentially, I'm pretty clueless as far as most things go handy-wise. I know DIY is much cheaper than hiring someone, but is there anything that I can grab at Home Depot or something that wont involve drilling anything or going pretty crazy as far as making things, or is there something that isn't ridiculously expensive that I could buy to at least soundproof my bedroom. I know that I'm not going to be able to do too much since I still feel anything that drives by in the walls, but cutting out on the sound would be extremely helpful. I've considered moving to the back bedroom, but the guy behind us has a 'business' that often involves a wood chipper, trucks, and various loud mechanical tools so that might not be a huge thing. Clearly, although this is a nice rental, there are a lot of things wrong as far as soundproofing goes (the front door, clearly not a solid core door, lets in TONS Of sound into the living room and the windows don't do much even though they were advertised as 'energy efficient'). I'm not sure what much can be done to block out sound from the door to the living room but it seems like a previous tenant cut it or something. I don't think I mentioned in my original post that there is a freight train about 3-4 blocks down the street that seems to becoming more frequent (it just killed a guy in early January) and the whistle/horn is absolutely ridiculous. I don't know if it's the weather change or what but it just feels like the sound in this house has gotten worse since I moved in at the end of November.


"I feel like I'm being attacked by sound all the time and it's driving me a bit insane." 

If anyone knows how you feel, it's me.  For me, ANY sound that bleeds through my walls at all triggers extreme irritation and anxiety because of my own neurological condition.  I've gone through exhaustive efforts to soundproof my entire bed room, and it's just ONGOING.  It feels like a 10 year war.  Sound is such a damned beast, and so many freaking people just don't seem to care.  Wait a minute, this isn't my support group... sorry.  That one's on yahoo.



I'm sorry to hear that, dude. Thanks for understanding...I know people think I'm insane. I just saw an ENT who told me I have hyperacusis thanks to some incompetent doctors who originally told me to protect my ears from all loud sounds, so now my sensitivity is extremely high. He described it to someone who had not seen sunlight in a month and went outside in broad daylight. Noise is about as easy to avoid as light.

Randy, thanks for you posts...but I'm pretty clueless as far as what I should do. Would some pictures of the rooms help? The living room has a picture window (one big one with 2 smaller ones on either side) and my bedroom has one window facing the street and the other facing a driveway. Ultimately, I just want to cut down on the noise as much as possible. I don't expect total silence, but a significant reduction would be awesome.

Thanks guys.

whatismisophonia

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Re: Help for someone with tinnitus and a noisy rental
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2013, 03:43:01 AM »
Well, you can screw hardibacker over your windows like I did (or just go with drywall if you don't have a saw with a diamond blade).  soundproofing the walls requres physically isolating the interior facing of the house from the exterior facing of the house.  This means double stud walls, staggered stud walls, or the drywall mounted on resilient channel or hat channel with resilient clips.  The sheer weight of the wall is also important; however, a heavy wall that does not have any disconnect or "decoupling" between it's exterior facing and it's interior facing portion by way of any of the methods I've just mentioned will not be as effective.  There is one more principle that can utilized called "damping", in which vibrations are converted into heat through friction.  Damping glues such as Greenglue or Quietglue pro can be used in between two sheets of drywall, and have a similar effect to decoupling.  The glue will not harden like construction adhesive, so the sheets must be screwed into place.  That said, adding an extra layer of drywall over your current layer with damping glue in between is not difficult or complicated, and you might talk to the land lord about it.  And for the love of God, talk to him/her about the hollow doors -_-     

p.s. energy efficient windows are not necessarily soundproof:  the air gaps between the panes of typical double paned windows are intended for keeping heat transfer to a minimum, and are to thin to be of any soundproofing benefit (the thin air gap acts like a spring and transfers too much vibration).  This is why dual window setups are recommended, as they mimic the size of the large air cavities in the walls much more.  You can acheive a basic double window by having a storm window attached to the exterior facing side of the house, and a double or single paned window attached to the interior facing side of the same window cavity; for future reference. 

 

anything