Author Topic: finding out where the noise is coming from  (Read 3958 times)

Nick Halloway

  • Guest
finding out where the noise is coming from
« on: October 31, 2001, 10:43:39 PM »
I'm trying to soundproof a room to keep out traffic
noise.  
The noise is a lot less and what's left is low-pitched
so I'm not sure where it's coming from.  
How can I figure out?  Would using a stethoscope at
various walls be a good idea?  
I saw stethoscopes in a vet supply catalog ... there
is one for $100 and one for $7.  Will the cheap one
work for this?
thanks ...

bjnash

  • Guest
Re: finding out where the noise is coming from
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2001, 04:38:32 AM »
: I'm trying to soundproof a room to keep out traffic
: noise.  
: The noise is a lot less and what's left is low-pitched
: so I'm not sure where it's coming from.  
: How can I figure out?  Would using a stethoscope at
: various walls be a good idea?  
: I saw stethoscopes in a vet supply catalog ... there
: is one for $100 and one for $7.  Will the cheap one
: work for this?
: thanks ...
Beleive it or not, with a little practice, your own ears make the best audio meters!  Our ears are highly directional and can easily be trained to accurately pick out not only the level of sounds, but their direction.  Try it!  

Nick Halloway

  • Guest
Re: finding out where the noise is coming from
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2001, 04:10:26 PM »
BJ,
You bet I have tried just listening.  But I've
already noticed my ears can deceive me.  It's low
pitched and not very loud.
I talked with you on the phone about this ... I've
done a lot of seal up a wall where a lot of noise
was coming through, but there is still too much noise
getting in.
So how could I really determine where the noise is still
getting through?  How would an acoustician do it?
Would a stethoscope work?
: : thanks ...
: Beleive it or not, with a little practice, your own ears make the best audio meters!  Our ears are highly directional and can easily be trained to accurately pick out not only the level of sounds, but their direction.  Try it!  

Nick Halloway

  • Guest
Re: finding out where the noise is coming from
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2001, 04:11:54 PM »
BJ,
You bet I have tried just listening.  But I've
already noticed my ears can deceive me.  It's low
pitched and not very loud.
I talked with you on the phone about this ... I've
done a lot of seal up a wall where a lot of noise
was coming through, but there is still too much noise
getting in.
So how could I really determine where the noise is still
getting through?  How would an acoustician do it?
Would a stethoscope work?
: : thanks ...
: Beleive it or not, with a little practice, your own ears make the best audio meters!  Our ears are highly directional and can easily be trained to accurately pick out not only the level of sounds, but their direction.  Try it!  

bjnash

  • Guest
Re: finding out where the noise is coming from
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2001, 11:26:21 PM »
: BJ,
: You bet I have tried just listening.  But I've
: already noticed my ears can deceive me.  It's low
: pitched and not very loud.
: I talked with you on the phone about this ... I've
: done a lot of seal up a wall where a lot of noise
: was coming through, but there is still too much noise
: getting in.
: So how could I really determine where the noise is still
: getting through?  How would an acoustician do it?
: Would a stethoscope work?
: : : thanks ...
: : Beleive it or not, with a little practice, your own ears make the best audio meters!  Our ears are highly directional and can easily be trained to accurately pick out not only the level of sounds, but their direction.  Try it!  
I'd guess that if it's low pitched like you say and difficult to pinpoint, it may be structure bourne sound and very difficult to control.  Placing soundproofing between it and the target (you) may not be possible, dampening itwould be the requirement. Such "ducting" of sound is not common but does occur frquently.  

Masonry is normally a good soundproofing material: until sound gets into it, then it will travel and follow the concrete readily, perhaps coming out in an unexpected place.  or, it will radiate such low frequency sound like a speaker cone.  


.

  • Guest
Re: finding out where the noise is coming from
« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2002, 07:45:46 AM »
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: : The noise is a lot less and what's left is low-pitched
: : so I'm not sure where it's coming from.  
: : How can I figure out?  Would using a stethoscope at
: : various walls be a good idea?  
: : I saw stethoscopes in a vet supply catalog ... there
: : is one for $100 and one for $7.  Will the cheap one
: : work for this?
: : thanks ...
: Beleive it or not, with a little practice, your own ears make the best audio meters!  Our ears are highly directional and can easily be trained to accurately pick out not only the level of sounds, but their direction.  Try it!