Author Topic: Soundproofing a bedroom  (Read 2432 times)

spiidey

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Soundproofing a bedroom
« on: February 03, 2013, 02:03:23 PM »
We're looking to soundproof a bedroom.

We're almost there with appointing a soundproofing company to do this (floor, walls, ceiling and door) and a separate glazing company to install triple glazing (to replace our existing double glazing) and secondary glazing, with an air gap/cavity of 120mm between the triple and secondary glazing.

Got a few questions that we're still a bit unsure about:-

1. Soundproofing company recommend installing acoustic vents on one of the external walls.  I'm not comfortable with this as that would then become a weak point in the overall solution, even if the vent is very high quality in terms of db reduction.  I've asked whether the vent can be installed on an internal wall and the company has recommended installing 4 on the wall between the bedroom we're looking to soundproof and the adjoining bedroom, but is asking that airflow in that adjoining room be appropriate either by installing an acoustic vent on an external wall in that room or by some other means.  I've got 2 queries on this:-
(a) Based on the bedroom dimensions of approx 2.5m wide x 2.7m long x 2.4m tall (after installation of soundproofing boards etc) and 4 acoustic vents on an internal wall, is there enough air in there to be able to sleep for 8-10 and not die from lack of oxygen?!!
(b) For the answer to (a) above to be "Yes", what do we need to do to be able to generate enough air flow in the adjoining bedroom for enough air to pass through the 4 acoustic vents? (install acoustic vent(s) on the external wall(s) of this bedroom?  Put a ceiling fan in this bedroom?  Something else?  Or do the acoustic vents on an internal wall simply not work?)
2. What about the door?  Company has recommended building an independent wall just in on the wall where the door sits and then using this new wall to house a "acoustic door" and allowing us to retain the existing door where it is (i.e. it would be "double-doored" - the existing door would open outwards into the hall, and the internal acoustic door would open inwards into the bedroom.  However, existing door sounds hollow, should we be looking for 2 acoustic doors to be installed or is this simply overkill?

Randy S

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Re: Soundproofing a bedroom
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2013, 05:45:08 PM »
Ok for the ventilation question, as long as they are pushing enough CFM you will be fine.
For the function of the acoustic vents I have not used them in my systems we use a baffle box system. Which still requires enough CFM to move the correct amount of air.

For the original door, yes you should replace this door with a Standard solid core door and make sure it to is sealed properly. The dead air space and frame isolation will make the system work well
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

spiidey

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Re: Soundproofing a bedroom
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2013, 08:55:08 PM »
Ok for the ventilation question, as long as they are pushing enough CFM you will be fine.
For the function of the acoustic vents I have not used them in my systems we use a baffle box system. Which still requires enough CFM to move the correct amount of air.

For the original door, yes you should replace this door with a Standard solid core door and make sure it to is sealed properly. The dead air space and frame isolation will make the system work well

Thanks for the reply.

What is "CFM"?

Randy S

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Re: Soundproofing a bedroom
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2013, 10:00:12 PM »
sorry,
CFM= means cubic feet per minute
this determines amount of air flow.
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

 

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