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Author Topic: Triple Leaf Effect windows  (Read 3005 times)

stakeknife

  • Guest
Triple Leaf Effect windows
« on: March 17, 2013, 10:45:00 AM »

I live by a busy road and have a number of windows facing the roadway. As such the traffic noise causes issues disturbing our sleep.  Currently, all windows are double glazed with sealed units. They have about a 12mm air gap. I was hoping to improve their performance by adding an inner window with a 100mm plus gap. Is this a waste of time? Will I just be creating the triple leaf effect? What are other options to improving this situation? Thanks.

johnbergstromslc

  • Guest
Re: Triple Leaf Effect windows
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2013, 03:02:48 PM »

You should read the existing posts before posting.  This very issue was covered in 'Installing additional interior window in master bedroom' post on 02/25/13 and 'Double window installation' post on 03/12/13...

stakeknife

  • Guest
Re: Triple Leaf Effect windows
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2013, 09:01:47 PM »

Thanks. I have read the existing posts. What I was after was a more precise answer to my own problem. I guess I could have posed my question differently. Other, than installing the windows, is there a way I can calculate the points of weakness or resonance using the numbers I have of for the thickness of the existing windows, the two air gaps and the third window? Is there a simple formula?

johnbergstromslc

  • Guest
Re: Triple Leaf Effect windows
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2013, 10:20:06 PM »

Nope, not a simple formula at all. 

Don't worry about it too much - you're not building a recording studio. 

The glass in your existing window is single-strength, 2.5mm thick or so.  Just don't use that thickness of glass and you can avoid resonance. 

If you can swing it, go for laminated glass, as thick as you can afford.  Make sure you get good sealing and you're good to go...

But as I advise as many people as I can, try a white-noise machine first.  It can mask a lot of noises.

stakeknife

  • Guest
Re: Triple Leaf Effect windows
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2013, 12:56:39 AM »

Thanks. I already have a white noise machine. I have looked at the window manufacturers specs and it looks to be 10mm glass/12mm air gap/6.38mm glass. I was thinking of adding the third 'leaf' as 10mm plexiglass with at least a 100mm air gap. Is this doomed to fail?

Bizzy

  • Guest
Re: Triple Leaf Effect windows
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2013, 06:25:46 PM »

Hi, I too have the same problem and just bought this house so I want to make sure I do things right.
I am going to start with adding a second window from the inside and also buying some soundproof drapes.

Have you checked to see if most of the noise is coming from the windows? Have you looked into adding soundproof drapes?

johnbergstromslc

  • Guest
Re: Triple Leaf Effect windows
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2013, 12:46:40 AM »

Thanks. I already have a white noise machine. I have looked at the window manufacturers specs and it looks to be 10mm glass/12mm air gap/6.38mm glass. I was thinking of adding the third 'leaf' as 10mm plexiglass with at least a 100mm air gap. Is this doomed to fail?

Where did you get these specs?  I haven't heard of any stock window with 10 mm glass, or 6 mm even.  They use as thin as possible glass - single strength.

If you had a window with that thick of glass, I doubt you'd have noise problems.

stakeknife

  • Guest
Re: Triple Leaf Effect windows
« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2013, 10:06:14 AM »

Laminated double glazed windows featuring 10mm and 6.38mm glass. 

http://www.vuewindows.com.au/assets/pdf/Pilkington%20Optilam%20Phon.pdf.