Author Topic: Double-wall construction  (Read 4937 times)

Larry Roberts

  • Guest
Double-wall construction
« on: November 15, 2001, 03:53:22 PM »
I'm finishing out a basement music room (drums, electric guitars, etc) and want to use a double-wall construction to minimize sound leakage (esp bass) into other parts of the house.
I'm a little vague on the exact construction techniques. For example, if the walls are isolated from one another, how do you seal between the walls at a door opening? Which wall is the door mounted to? How do you construct the ceiling when using the double-wall construction?
In short, is there anyplace I can get more information (perhaps building plans) for room-within-a-room construction?
Thanks.

bjnash

  • Guest
Re: Double-wall construction
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2001, 10:15:43 PM »
: I'm finishing out a basement music room (drums, electric guitars, etc) and want to use a double-wall construction to minimize sound leakage (esp bass) into other parts of the house.
: I'm a little vague on the exact construction techniques. For example, if the walls are isolated from one another, how do you seal between the walls at a door opening? Which wall is the door mounted to? How do you construct the ceiling when using the double-wall construction?
: In short, is there anyplace I can get more information (perhaps building plans) for room-within-a-room construction?
: Thanks.
I don't know on any plans, it's fairly straight-forward.  Use two doors in a airlock type manner.  The airspace between the walls is important for low frequency control and each wall has to be isolated from the others airspace for best results.  The ceiling is done in the same amnner at the walls

Larry Roberts

  • Guest
Re: Double-wall construction
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2001, 05:02:28 PM »
: : I'm finishing out a basement music room (drums, electric guitars, etc) and want to use a double-wall construction to minimize sound leakage (esp bass) into other parts of the house.
: : I'm a little vague on the exact construction techniques. For example, if the walls are isolated from one another, how do you seal between the walls at a door opening? Which wall is the door mounted to? How do you construct the ceiling when using the double-wall construction?
: : In short, is there anyplace I can get more information (perhaps building plans) for room-within-a-room construction?
: : Thanks.
: I don't know on any plans, it's fairly straight-forward.  Use two doors in a airlock type manner.  The airspace between the walls is important for low frequency control and each wall has to be isolated from the others airspace for best results.  The ceiling is done in the same amnner at the walls
Sorry to be dense, but I don't understand how you can isolate one wall's airspace from the other. I thought there was one single airspace between the two walls, and that the idea was to separate the two walls' frames to prevent sound transmission. Am I wrong?
Also, I'm still wondering how I seal the gaps bewteen the walls at places like door frames, where the gap will be noticable but the airspace still needs to be sealed? Rubber gasket? Caulk?
Thanks for your help.


bjnash

  • Guest
Re: Double-wall construction
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2001, 05:25:55 PM »
: : : I'm finishing out a basement music room (drums, electric guitars, etc) and want to use a double-wall construction to minimize sound leakage (esp bass) into other parts of the house.
: : : I'm a little vague on the exact construction techniques. For example, if the walls are isolated from one another, how do you seal between the walls at a door opening? Which wall is the door mounted to? How do you construct the ceiling when using the double-wall construction?
: : : In short, is there anyplace I can get more information (perhaps building plans) for room-within-a-room construction?
: : : Thanks.
: : I don't know on any plans, it's fairly straight-forward.  Use two doors in a airlock type manner.  The airspace between the walls is important for low frequency control and each wall has to be isolated from the others airspace for best results.  The ceiling is done in the same amnner at the walls
: Sorry to be dense, but I don't understand how you can isolate one wall's airspace from the other. I thought there was one single airspace between the two walls, and that the idea was to separate the two walls' frames to prevent sound transmission. Am I wrong?
: Also, I'm still wondering how I seal the gaps bewteen the walls at places like door frames, where the gap will be noticable but the airspace still needs to be sealed? Rubber gasket? Caulk?
: Thanks for your help.
What's meant about the airspace being sealed is that each wall/ceiling space is contiguous to it's own, not connected in any way to the other walls, ceiling airspace.
And yes, it takes a lot of sealant, that's why we sell the caulk in big tubes!