Author Topic: Sound dampening for vocal work  (Read 5296 times)

Darquehand

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Sound dampening for vocal work
« on: October 16, 2014, 08:35:34 PM »
Hi guys, I've been scouring the web for a forum to post to. I've been looking into this whole soundproofing thing for a while now.

I am looking to build a smallish booth for my room in which to record vocal work. It could be singing, voice acting, reviews; anything. The bottom line is that everything I've seen for soundproofing either talks about reduction of outside noise or talks about drum-kits, guitars and other really loud noise.

In this regard I'd only be performing vocal work and so all I really want to know is how best to keep the noise down for neighbors and such. That's it. I don't need a dead room for perfect vocal work I just need to be able to speak at full volume.

If you could give me ideas and tips on materials and such that'd be amazing.

Thanks in advance.

Darquehand

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Re: Sound dampening for vocal work
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2014, 04:35:46 PM »
Any thoughts? Its just basic vocal work so anything that can lower the noise level and keep me out of trouble with neighbors is great.

Randy S

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Re: Sound dampening for vocal work
« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2014, 03:21:44 PM »
you can use this material to line your vocal booth.
http://www.supersoundproofingsales.com/Mass-Loaded-Vinyl-48W-w_Closed-Cell-per-foot/productinfo/09-00005CC-54F/

install this material foam side facing source.

Try and make your vocal booth as heavy as possible and seal it up like a fish tank for best results.

Randy S.
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

Darquehand

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Re: Sound dampening for vocal work
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2014, 09:39:28 PM »
I've had another look around the web trying to find out what exactly what I'd need. I've come up with what I think would work for me.

I'd build a wood frame for the booth which is going to be relatively small (It's only going to be me in there anyway). Then fiberglass insulation between the supports. Then for the interior walls I'd set up resilient channel. I've seen videos for these 'Genie Clips' that apparently are more effective that simply screwing the bar to the wood. Then I'd attach drywall to the channel. I've also ready up about these materials you can get to attach behind the drywall as a more effective sound blocker. I guess It wouldn't hurt to use that too. After that I'd be putting up this sound padding stuff I've seen that's cheap and effective. Outer walls would be doubled drywall sandwiched together with green glue in between.

All I know about soundproofing is from the videos and articles I've seen. There are a few questions I have.

1) Is what I've described an adequate solution for vocal work?
2) Is that the correct way to use resilient channel? I'm aiming to do that to the ceiling as well if it'll help.
3) The Floor!! I have no Idea what I need to do to the floor. I'm on the ground floor of my building btw.

As always any advice or info would be greatly appreciated.

Darquehand

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Re: Sound dampening for vocal work
« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2014, 06:05:48 PM »
Any thoughts? Is that maybe overkill soundproofing for vocals? Or do I need more? Please any advice would be great.

Randy S

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Re: Sound dampening for vocal work
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2014, 06:20:10 PM »
this is a bit of overkill for vocals unless you are concerned with street noise or other low frequency penetrating the vocal booth.
or you plan on doing more than vocals in the booth.

as long as you build a free standing booth I do not think you will need to do a floating system.
Now if you choose to attach to another structure you would need to decouple.

Randy S.

you can always contact me direct to discuss.
760-752-3030 ext 3095
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

Darquehand

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Re: Sound dampening for vocal work
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2014, 06:45:05 AM »
It was always more about blocking out my own sound than outside sounds. I'm just concerned about my neighbors.

Darquehand

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Re: Sound dampening for vocal work
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2014, 08:38:34 PM »
Right I now have the resources to build my booth. If someone could tell me exactly what I'll need. I mean materials because I don't want to waste money if I only need certain things. Like I've said already I want to be able to speak or sing loudly without anyone hearing outside the booth. What would I need to achieve this level of proofing?

Darquehand

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Re: Sound dampening for vocal work
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2014, 05:40:24 PM »
Guys this is the last time I'm bumping. I don't mean to keep bumping this post up but I don't know where else to find this stuff out.

I'm at a loss here and could really use some input from people experienced in this area. I literally don't know where to start.

Randy S

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Re: Sound dampening for vocal work
« Reply #9 on: November 13, 2014, 05:52:34 PM »
Why dont you give me a call direct and lets discuss it in detail so you can have a better understanding and you will be able to make the same decisions I make when I consult on these projects.

I look forward to your call.

Randy S.
760-752-3030 ext 3095
888-942-7723 ext 3095
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

art noxon

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Re: Sound dampening for vocal work
« Reply #10 on: December 07, 2014, 05:52:35 AM »
This is complicated because it's not just about soundproofing.  It's about soundproofing and at the same time not ruining how your voice sounds at the mic. 

Your idea about a small box with resilient channel or clips and sheetrock inside is well intended and all wrong, very wrong.  Don't even try it, you'll never get your voice right and sound absorption inside doesn't help.  It's about bass loading and sound panels don't work in the bass range.  Even if the did, it still doesn't work.  Trust me. I tried long ago and I had all the bass traps in the world at that time at my disposal.   The best vocal room we ever got was made out of alternating 1/2 round TubeTraps and plexiglass strips, walls, door and ceiling.  It was a vocal booth that utilized the early reflection sound fusion technique, our QSF system.  Pete Townshend got one of the first rooms like thi and loved it.   

But back to the job at hand.......If you must build a box, make it as large as possible and curve the sheetrock walls and ceiling by not attaching it to much more but the ends of the panels and letting the middle sag.  Use panel adhesive to glue the edges together.  You can overlap the sagging sheetrock so you get ribbing and stronger joints.   To seal sagging walls build a square column floor to ceiling in the corner, deep enough so the sagging sheetrock can be left with a small gap and sealed to the square column with acoustic caulk.  Your sagging ceiling also wants to not be attached to the actual ceiling of your room but it can seal to the side walls of your room as long as 1/8th inch or more air gap is between the walls and the edge of the sagging sheetrock.  Of course add sound absorption fiberglass batt between the sag walls and ceiling and the real surfaces of your room. 

Of course you will do double doors and weather strip them, air tight.  Add sheetrock seals to your window casings.   Add absorption where the curved panels make corners.  that will become your econo bass/treble traps for the room.   Building a room out of studio polys erases the small room signature from your mic and adds lots of low level diffuse early reflections for that wonderfully natural sounding sound fusion recording technique. 

Problem with sound tight rooms is that they are air tight.  You have to have a fan and open doors between sessions and air out your room.  Don't ever use hot lights in your room.  Keep a silent fan in your room to circulate air so things feel comfortable. 
Don't blow air on a ribbon mic. 

Art Noxon, Acoustic Engineer
Pres of ASC TubeTrap/WallDamp