Author Topic: creating an (almost) sound proof room, help needed  (Read 1777 times)

Gideon_

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creating an (almost) sound proof room, help needed
« on: December 19, 2014, 08:59:17 PM »
Hi everyone:

I will move into a new apartment shortly and I recently began working from home. Usually the outside noise doesn't bother me but lately 2 things have been happening. I've been getting many headaches indirectly because of this but especially I realized that for my particular work (online business from home) the outside noise (and I mean sometimes even coming from miles away) filters through my mic and other devices that may capture sound (including cellphone). Please also have in mind that i've never had this happen, also my first time in any online forum and especially, at my age some explanation for things with patience might be required.

I want to create a room that reduces the outside noise to a minimum or have a sort of sound proof room in which i can work without outside interference. Then my questions are these.

I simply want to add something existing to whats already in this apartment. No rebuilding, no taking down walls to add/put extra materials. I just want to know what to and how to do with say, this studio proofing studio foam tiles (that I found online, or any others). If I have a room that I already envision as my working area, so if I put this tiles inside this office room, will I be blocking the outside noise or just not letting the noise from my room go outside the apartment ? Sorry if my questions seem too basic but I have no idea as I've never had these problems before.

Any advice as to how to keep outside noise to a minimum ? Or is it that my whole approach is mistaken ?

Thanks again for reading.

Randy S

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Re: creating an (almost) sound proof room, help needed
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2014, 05:05:29 PM »
sorry to say, but your approach is wrong.
The tiles you refer to are for acoustical conditioning, changing the echo in the room..this does not stop the sound that is penetrating the walls.
You will need to do construction in order to reduce this problem...
You will have to double the weight of the wall just to see a 40% reduction of noise and if you want more than 40% reduction you will have to rebuild the wall correctly.

feel free to call us direct to discuss.

Randy S.
760-752-3030 ext 3095
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
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888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

margareta

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Re: creating an (almost) sound proof room, help needed
« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2015, 10:34:54 AM »
According to me you should do some changes with your construction.You can go for acoustic treatment for it.There are many products available in the market so using that you can easily solve your problem.Just try some suspended ceilings and acoustic panels for it.

Randy S

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Re: creating an (almost) sound proof room, help needed
« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2015, 03:10:48 PM »
Posted by: margareta
« on: Today at 01:34:54 AM » Insert Quote
According to me you should do some changes with your construction.You can go for acoustic treatment for it.There are many products available in the market so using that you can easily solve your problem.Just try some suspended ceilings and acoustic panels for it.


This is a good example of Bad Advise, this poster did not even bother reading the thread to see what the OP's problem was about..."outside noise coming into a room" and their advise is a complete waste of hard earned money that will do nothing for his noise problem..
You can not beat the laws of physics...
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

danwriter

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Re: creating an (almost) sound proof room, help needed
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2016, 03:34:51 PM »
"the outside noise (and I mean sometimes even coming from miles away) filters through my mic and other devices that may capture sound (including cellphone)"

Not sure if I'm reading this correctly, but if some of the extraneous sound is being picked up by our headset microphone, get one with better off-axis rejection capability. When shopping, use "rejection as part of the keyword search. B&H in Ne York is a good place to start.