Author Topic: Question about noise from unit above  (Read 3814 times)

Robert

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Question about noise from unit above
« on: January 01, 2002, 06:36:22 PM »
I have an owner of a unit above me.  He has added ceramic tile in the bulk of his unit.  He has stated that he was a sound engineer in the past and him changing his flooring from carpet to tile has not added to the sound transmission between the units.  I disagree with what he is saying as I can now hear every footstep in his place, especially when they are wearing shoes in the unit.  What is the normal increase in sound when someone makes a change from carpet to a hard tile surface?
He also states that he didn't do anything to increase the sound, but didn't do anything do decrease the sound either.  What could he have done to insulate the transmission of additional sounds from the installation of tile?
I have also heard an increase in creeking of the subfloor in the bedroom area of the unit.  I believe this has been caused by the additional weight of the tile in the bulk of the unit. The reason I state this is that I used to hear poping and crunching sounds periodcally and now hear it with every step in the unit after the installation of the tile. Do you have any thoughts about this?  Can you speak to the thought that the extra weight in the unit has weakened the subflooring?
My unit is approximately 1200 square feet.  What are the options for my unit to stop the tranmission of the creaking and most importantly the sound of "stomping" coming from the occupants of the unit above?  How well will the material that bonds to the outside of the drywall (applied to ceiling) work in stopping the sound?  Approximate costs?
Thank you.

bjnash

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Re: Question about noise from unit above
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2002, 09:26:38 PM »
: I have an owner of a unit above me.  He has added ceramic tile in the bulk of his unit.  He has stated that he was a sound engineer in the past and him changing his flooring from carpet to tile has not added to the sound transmission between the units.  I disagree with what he is saying as I can now hear every footstep in his place, especially when they are wearing shoes in the unit.  What is the normal increase in sound when someone makes a change from carpet to a hard tile surface?
: He also states that he didn't do anything to increase the sound, but didn't do anything do decrease the sound either.  What could he have done to insulate the transmission of additional sounds from the installation of tile?
: I have also heard an increase in creeking of the subfloor in the bedroom area of the unit.  I believe this has been caused by the additional weight of the tile in the bulk of the unit. The reason I state this is that I used to hear poping and crunching sounds periodcally and now hear it with every step in the unit after the installation of the tile. Do you have any thoughts about this?  Can you speak to the thought that the extra weight in the unit has weakened the subflooring?
: My unit is approximately 1200 square feet.  What are the options for my unit to stop the tranmission of the creaking and most importantly the sound of "stomping" coming from the occupants of the unit above?  How well will the material that bonds to the outside of the drywall (applied to ceiling) work in stopping the sound?  Approximate costs?
: Thank you.
you are correct in all the issues you've raised.  I'd suggest contacting the Condo Association to see what the CC&R's have to say about this.  Most are quite strict about these matters and do not permit such modifications just for the reasons you've enumerated.
Solutions?  Have him take it out is the best as there probably is no way you will ever be able to block this sound from coming down.
What should he have done? Sound blocking material under the tile would have helped, but the installation was careless to the extreme if you can hear the floor creaking- that means it was loose to begin with.
A sound engineer in the past?  Maybe that's why he's still not one- couldn't make it with that kind of mindset.