Author Topic: Soundproofing elevator noise  (Read 3172 times)

krypton

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Soundproofing elevator noise
« on: October 06, 2016, 02:04:56 PM »
Hi,
I live in a high rise condo.
Condo (specifically the bathroom and a closet in a bedroom) are sharing the wall with elevator shaft.
There is operational noise and squeaking noise that can be heard in the bedroom. Assumption is that the noise is being transmitted when counterweight is my floor. Could be impact noise. Feels like there is a bang and then the whole wall is squeaking. Even the wall that is not directly facing the elevator shaft is also squeaking.
Management attempted to fix the issue several times but was not successful
Looking into options to soundproof.
Please let me know if you think this is possible and feasible in a condo. What are my options ?

Randy S

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Re: Soundproofing elevator noise
« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2016, 03:19:45 PM »
Krypton,

Because the elevator shaft is built in structurally the only option you would have is to install a decoupled soundproof wall on your side.
This would require removal of the existing drywall and a decoupled system installed.
Just doing a single wall will allow a flanking around the decoupled wall and therefore you would experience the noise and vibration from perpendicular walls / ceiling and possibly floor.

If you want to really take care of the problem you would most likely have to do the entire room.

Feel free to give me a call direct if you want to discuss particulars of the project.

Randy S.
760-752-3030

 
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

krypton

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Re: Soundproofing elevator noise
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2016, 02:50:19 AM »
Krypton,

Because the elevator shaft is built in structurally the only option you would have is to install a decoupled soundproof wall on your side.
This would require removal of the existing drywall and a decoupled system installed.
Just doing a single wall will allow a flanking around the decoupled wall and therefore you would experience the noise and vibration from perpendicular walls / ceiling and possibly floor.

If you want to really take care of the problem you would most likely have to do the entire room.

Feel free to give me a call direct if you want to discuss particulars of the project.

Randy S.
760-752-3030

 

Thanks Randy.
How much room am I going to lose by installing decoupled wall ? Would sound clips work ? Should I place Roxul in between ? Since this is a condo I cannot afford to lose too much room. What is the most effective way ? How about Roxul --> resilient channel --> quiet rock ?

Thanks

krypton

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Re: Soundproofing elevator noise
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2016, 06:29:49 PM »
I had a contractor come in and tell me that there is concrete behind drywall. Basically we will lose room if we decide to do the decoupling.
I am wondering if using green glue and putting another sheet of quiet rock on existing drywall would damped the squeaking noise at all.
Understood that it will not soundproof the room completely, but can it help at all ?
Thanks

Randy S

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Re: Soundproofing elevator noise
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2016, 05:45:52 PM »
you might get 10% change with out decoupling of the wall.

If you decide to decouple with clips and channel total space lost would be 2 5/8"

Randy S.
760-752-3030
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

krypton

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Re: Soundproofing elevator noise
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2016, 12:23:51 AM »
Does it make sense that currently there is drywall directly on concrete ? This building is only 7 year old.
If this is the case, should we remove existing drywall and mount the channel directly onto the concrete ?

Thanks Randy

Randy S

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Re: Soundproofing elevator noise
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2016, 03:26:33 PM »
As long as the drywall is directly attached to the concrete then yes you can attach the clips into the concrete, as long as there is no studs...
then you will use R-8 insulation between the channel filling the void, followed by 1/2" hardie backer cement board / green glue/ 5/8" drywall.

1/4" gap around the perimeter of each layer to be filled with acoustic caulking.

Randy S.
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

krypton

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Re: Soundproofing elevator noise
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2016, 02:36:42 PM »
Randy,

After some analysis, the room is way too small to install resilient channel.
Is there anything else that can be done to reduce the squeaking noise ?
I attached a layout of my room. The wall where the most noise can be heard is actually not direct facing the elevator shaft. It's the wall that I labeled "Wall that is squeaking" I believe this is concrete wall with a drywall sheet slapped onto it. It's also shared with a neighbor. The neighbor claims he cannot hear anything. If I put my ear against the wall there is crazy amount of noise (coming from the elevator). Of course not all of it is audible when my ear is not against the wall (thankfully). The elevator shaft also extends into neighbor's unit
Also on top of this wall runs a duct from the bathroom.

Thanks again

Randy S

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Re: Soundproofing elevator noise
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2016, 03:09:32 PM »
The problem is going to be cost vs. reduction. If you can not decouple the value of reduction drops dramatically. especially since it is a concrete wall...you already have a value of mass...
The only other option would be green glue and another layer of drywall.
I would estimate about 10%-20% reduction at best.

Randy S.
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

krypton

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Re: Soundproofing elevator noise
« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2016, 03:34:56 PM »
The problem is going to be cost vs. reduction. If you can not decouple the value of reduction drops dramatically. especially since it is a concrete wall...you already have a value of mass...
The only other option would be green glue and another layer of drywall.
I would estimate about 10%-20% reduction at best.

Randy S.
That's unfortunate. I guess there is no easy way to test before starting this project ?
So if I were to try this, would you remove the existing drywall from concrete and then install 2 sheets of quiet rock with green glue ? or just install quiet rock on existing drywall ?

Randy S

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Re: Soundproofing elevator noise
« Reply #10 on: October 17, 2016, 04:17:17 PM »
quiet rock is not going to get you anymore value, you already have mass.
Just install 3 tubes of green glue per 4' x 8' sheet of 5/8" drywall over existing drywall.

Randy S.


Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

krypton

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Re: Soundproofing elevator noise
« Reply #11 on: October 17, 2016, 04:33:34 PM »
quiet rock is not going to get you anymore value, you already have mass.
Just install 3 tubes of green glue per 4' x 8' sheet of 5/8" drywall over existing drywall.

Randy S.
Ok thanks. How should I handle the ductwork that runs in the corners of the ceiling ? Rip it open and sound proof as well ? Could the duct be contributing the problem ?
It looks like this https://harishmaraj.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/38_niagara_suite_508_mls_hid631777_roomlivingroom.jpg
ps. this is not my unit, I just found a quick picture
Thanks

Randy S

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Re: Soundproofing elevator noise
« Reply #12 on: October 17, 2016, 05:36:15 PM »
Yes it could be contributing to the noise issue, so you would 2 issues to deal with.
1. sound coming out of the duct and soffit.
2. sound going through the duct.

Soundproofing the soffit does not stop sound going through the duct, that would require a baffle box built in line with the duct.


Randy S.
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

krypton

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Re: Soundproofing elevator noise
« Reply #13 on: October 18, 2016, 02:16:55 PM »
Yes it could be contributing to the noise issue, so you would 2 issues to deal with.
1. sound coming out of the duct and soffit.
2. sound going through the duct.

Soundproofing the soffit does not stop sound going through the duct, that would require a baffle box built in line with the duct.


Randy S.

Randy,

Sorry for another question, but it's beyond me how is so much squeaking noise being transmitted through a concrete wall that is adjacent with the elevator wall. If it was the direct wall, I can understand, but I can hear it 15 feet away from the elevator, on the opposite side of the room. I understand how noise and vibration works, but is this normal ? Could it be that soffit/duct are mostly contributing to the issue ?


Thanks

Randy S

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Re: Soundproofing elevator noise
« Reply #14 on: October 18, 2016, 03:16:27 PM »
This is not uncommon, the speed of sound through concrete is 10,600 fps (1,129 fps for airborne).
Yes, the soffit could be the main contributor but you will not know until you make the first attempt at soundproofing.

Remember you are not stopping the noise at all, you are simply adding resistance to an area therefore moving the sound to the next area of least resistance.

This is why soundproofing at the source is always the best value of reduction, treating it at the receiving end forces you to take chances on which areas to treat first to see what value is achieved.

There could also be other variables in play that give these results like all hard surfaces in a room will make the perception of sound louder and move to other areas of the room.

Randy S.

 
Randy Sieg

Super Soundproofing Co
www.soundproofing.org
888-942-7723
Ph. 760-752-3030
Fax.760-752-3040

 

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