Author Topic: Condo Bathroom down to studs. Challenges soundproofing  (Read 446 times)

sagrr

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Condo Bathroom down to studs. Challenges soundproofing
« on: March 09, 2017, 03:05:37 AM »
My TINY condo bathroom borders my neighbor's kitchen on one side and bathroom on another. I also have upstairs and downstairs neighbors with the same bathroom layouts stacked above and below. I would like to install speakers in the shower ceiling and do everything I can to soundproof it from everyone.

One of the challenges in blocking space is this section below the floor.
This is crawl space that doesn't have any wall built in between. There are also a lot of (too many?) obstacles in the way to actually build any kind of solid wall easily - including copper water pipes.

How should I approach closing this open air?

Ideas I had:
Should I fill it up with the cheapest insulation I can find and then top off the edge with rock wool?
Should I spray foam it up and top it with rock wool?
This is crawl space that doesn't have any wall built in between. There are also a lot of (too many?) obstacles in the way to actually build any kind of solid wall easily - including copper water pipes.

How should I approach closing this open air?

Ideas I had:
Should I fill it up with the cheapest insulation I can find and then top off the edge with rock wool?
Should I spray foam it up and top it with rock wool?

sagrr

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  • Posts: 2
Re: Condo Bathroom down to studs. Challenges soundproofing
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2017, 03:08:56 AM »
Here is a link: http://imgur.com/a/14Q5w

Randy S

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Re: Condo Bathroom down to studs. Challenges soundproofing
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2017, 04:18:50 PM »
Sorry to say but, I would not attempt this project.
Just putting insulation in the void will not do much for soundproofing.
You would have to actually seal this entire cavity air tight and build a heavy dense box for the speaker to fit in.
After all that you would still get sound transmitting through the actual framing structure.

The costs involved and potential moisture or future pipe repairs would be a nightmare.

A surface mounted speaker would be far better and less of a headache.

Best Regards,

Randy S.
Randy Sieg

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