Author Topic: Duplex: Soundproofing between floors, next steps?  (Read 1217 times)

afry316

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Duplex: Soundproofing between floors, next steps?
« on: April 15, 2018, 12:21:30 PM »
Hello -

This community is awesome. I have read numerous stories and learned a lot, my only regret is not finding this website sooner :-o

My story/request:

I have a duplex, which is split level and is of brick construction (exterior walls) and solid wooden joists. I live in the bottom portion and rent out the top. The entire upstairs is carpeted/padded except for the kitchen. The kitchen happens to be above my bedroom. In the past this was not a problem, but my new tenants work late (dont come home til 10-11) and then they are stomping around in the kitchen. I have talked to them about being quite and honestly I am not even sure if its them at this point or just the poor construction. Once I realized this problem I scrambled to fix it in several attempts.

Attempt 1: I cut holes at every joist and blew in insulation. This worked good for the airbone noises. I could not really hear anyone talking or any noise like that. However, I could still hear them walking around and dropping things.

Attempt 2: I found out about Green Glue and read that adding mass to the ceiling would lessen the vibrations. So, I added two layers of 5/8 drywall to the ceiling with green glue sandwiched in between. This helped a bit, but not a dramatic improvement. Airborne noises are virtually non existent, but the impact noises were still easily heard.

Attempt 3: I asked the tenants to let me know when they were going on vacation and I would do some improvements upstairs. The kitchen floor was porceline tile, which was on cement board that was screwed directly to the wooden subfloor - no underlayment. So what I did while there were gone was I installed a floating lament floor on top of the tile floor. I used a premium wool underlayment underneath the floating floor, which claimed high IIC numbers. This seemed to work well. It definitely dampened the impact noise but I can still hear it. Its not terrible, but I have become fixated on figure this out once and for all.

So that takes me to today. I am not sure where I should attack this problem from now. Should I installed a vinyl floor on top of the floating with a better underlayment? Should I throw in the towel on my bedroom ceiling and do a decoupled ceiling? Any suggestions on what would be the best approach?

Thanks for listening!

-Andrew