Author Topic: Soundproofing existing ceiling in condo  (Read 4236 times)

Jeff Handibode

  • Guest
Soundproofing existing ceiling in condo
« on: March 27, 2002, 01:07:18 AM »
Please tell me that it can really be done?!?!?!?! The ceilings in my existing unit are painted with popcorn paint ( and that's about all I can tell you) I don't know the thickness of the rock up there! I consider my self relatively handy and would like to know the best way to seriously reduce the noise from above( t.v yelling, running kid which is very loud) without taking a second mortgage!? Or if i'll need to hire someone to do it for me!
Please help me out here!
 thanks,
      Jeff

boborther

  • Guest
Re: Soundproofing existing ceiling in condo
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2002, 03:37:24 AM »
Jeff,
Sorry we haven't been available to answer a lot of questions recently, but the soundproofing business has been booming.
Well to start with you could float your ceiling. By this I mean that you would build a false floating ceiling which would be supported on resilient channel, and a new layer of drywall. Actually we really recommend using the new sound clips and hat channel to float the ceiling. The suspended ceiling breaks the impact sound circuit which comes from above. Things such as heavy foot steps, and TV's and Stereos. These sounds travel down the floor joists and use your existing ceiling as a soundboard. By floating the ceiling, you aleviate the majority of these sounds simply by making the sound work.
Jeff, go to the web page and do some research on ceilings and walls. Should be on the home page in the little yellow box. There is a wealth of knowledge there. Then when you are ready to do the job, give me a call at Super Soundproofing @ (760)749-7049. We can solve this problem.
Sincerely,
Bob Orther
www.soundproofing.org


Dan

  • Guest
Re: Soundproofing existing ceiling in condo
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2002, 04:41:21 PM »
I would ignore this advice. I installed a false floating ceiling using the "super sound clips" (with soundproofing tape + acoustical caulk + two layers of heavy drywall) and it made very little difference (maybe 30%) considering the large expense and inconvenience.
Be skeptical with people that have something to sell you. Truth be told, sound issues like the one you describe are very difficult to deal with successfully (especially from within your apartment). The only approach worth trying is to block the sound at the source by reconstructing the floor above you, adding heaving carpeting, etc.
Dan
: Jeff,
:  Sorry we haven't been available to answer a lot of questions recently, but the soundproofing business has been booming.
:  Well to start with you could float your ceiling. By this I mean that you would build a false floating ceiling which would be supported on resilient channel, and a new layer of drywall. Actually we really recommend using the new sound clips and hat channel to float the ceiling. The suspended ceiling breaks the impact sound circuit which comes from above. Things such as heavy foot steps, and TV's and Stereos. These sounds travel down the floor joists and use your existing ceiling as a soundboard. By floating the ceiling, you aleviate the majority of these sounds simply by making the sound work.
:  Jeff, go to the web page and do some research on ceilings and walls. Should be on the home page in the little yellow box. There is a wealth of knowledge there. Then when you are ready to do the job, give me a call at Super Soundproofing @ (760)749-7049. We can solve this problem.
: Sincerely,
: Bob Orther
: www.soundproofing.org


Penny

  • Guest
help any clues!!
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2002, 07:42:07 PM »
Hi We own a restaurant opposite a bar, which blasts music at high decibells. The restaurant is outdoor/inddor, so I don't want to close it in.
Any ideas about reflecting sound waves with discreet equiptment?
Penny

bjnash

  • Guest
Re: help any clues!!
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2002, 01:58:58 AM »
: Hi We own a restaurant opposite a bar, which blasts music at high decibells. The restaurant is outdoor/inddor, so I don't want to close it in.
: Any ideas about reflecting sound waves with discreet equiptment?
: Penny
You mean "Active Noise Cancelling" (ANC).  This is a technique for sending out a soundwave of the same frequency but in phase with the original sound- thus cancelling it out.  Such amplifiers are available, but for sound of a steady frequency- one that doesn't vary much.
Not practical for the noise problem you have.


 

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