Author Topic: you guessed it, noisy upstairs  (Read 7253 times)

michael

  • Guest
you guessed it, noisy upstairs
« on: April 30, 2002, 06:21:12 AM »
Bob, I have a duplex(upper/lower) and have covered the upstairs hardwoods with (in this order)foam underlayment(approx.1/16" like pergo regular underlay),>1/4" soft ikea waferboard, 3/8 plywood and then oak parquet floors.  All my efforts were not in vain but there is still significant noise that would wake/disturb someone downstairs.  I talked to a sound engineer i ran into at homedepot who suggested drop-channel ceilings.  He also told me to go online to find out more so here i am.  How much ceiling will i lose?


Dan

  • Guest
Re: you guessed it, noisy upstairs
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2002, 02:39:24 PM »
Don't expect much from a dropped ceiling. I installed one using the Super Sound Clips + Sound Proofing Tape + Acoutical Tape + two heavy layers of 5/8" drywall and it made maybe a 25-30% difference. Certainly not worth the time and expense, IMHO.
Dan
: Bob, I have a duplex(upper/lower) and have covered the upstairs hardwoods with (in this order)foam underlayment(approx.1/16" like pergo regular underlay),>1/4" soft ikea waferboard, 3/8 plywood and then oak parquet floors.  All my efforts were not in vain but there is still significant noise that would wake/disturb someone downstairs.  I talked to a sound engineer i ran into at homedepot who suggested drop-channel ceilings.  He also told me to go online to find out more so here i am.  How much ceiling will i lose?



bjnash

  • Guest
Re: you guessed it, noisy upstairs
« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2002, 03:34:38 AM »
: Don't expect much from a dropped ceiling. I installed one using the Super Sound Clips + Sound Proofing Tape + Acoutical Tape + two heavy layers of 5/8" drywall and it made maybe a 25-30% difference. Certainly not worth the time and expense, IMHO.
: Dan
: : Bob, I have a duplex(upper/lower) and have covered the upstairs hardwoods with (in this order)foam underlayment(approx.1/16" like pergo regular underlay),>1/4" soft ikea waferboard, 3/8 plywood and then oak parquet floors.  All my efforts were not in vain but there is still significant noise that would wake/disturb someone downstairs.  I talked to a sound engineer i ran into at homedepot who suggested drop-channel ceilings.  He also told me to go online to find out more so here i am.  How much ceiling will i lose?
2 layers of drywall at 8 STC points per layer is only 16- sounds like someone went on the cheap again.  Read below on how it should have been done.


Greg

  • Guest
Re: you guessed it, noisy upstairs
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2002, 06:58:11 PM »

Two layers of 5/8" drywall is what you recommend on your website!!!


: : Don't expect much from a dropped ceiling. I installed one using the Super Sound Clips + Sound Proofing Tape + Acoutical Tape + two heavy layers of 5/8" drywall and it made maybe a 25-30% difference. Certainly not worth the time and expense, IMHO.
: : Dan
: : : Bob, I have a duplex(upper/lower) and have covered the upstairs hardwoods with (in this order)foam underlayment(approx.1/16" like pergo regular underlay),>1/4" soft ikea waferboard, 3/8 plywood and then oak parquet floors.  All my efforts were not in vain but there is still significant noise that would wake/disturb someone downstairs.  I talked to a sound engineer i ran into at homedepot who suggested drop-channel ceilings.  He also told me to go online to find out more so here i am.  How much ceiling will i lose?
: 2 layers of drywall at 8 STC points per layer is only 16- sounds like someone went on the cheap again.  Read below on how it should have been done.



bjnash

  • Guest
Re: you guessed it, noisy upstairs
« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2002, 09:14:56 PM »
:

Two layers of 5/8" drywall is what you recommend on your website!!!


SORRY- LOOKS LIKE YOU GOT THAT WRONG TOO!! We don't recommend double layers of the same materials, (Contractors do- they don't know any better), we recommend using different ones for reasons we explain over the phone to those who don't want to go off half-baked.  Also: To have any noticable difference would mean at least a real 50% sound reduction. It's be cause of the way we hear.  bj
======================================================
: : : Don't expect much from a dropped ceiling. I installed one using the Super Sound Clips + Sound Proofing Tape + Acoutical Tape + two heavy layers of 5/8" drywall and it made maybe a 25-30% difference. Certainly not worth the time and expense, IMHO.
: : : Dan
: : : : Bob, I have a duplex(upper/lower) and have covered the upstairs hardwoods with (in this order)foam underlayment(approx.1/16" like pergo regular underlay),>1/4" soft ikea waferboard, 3/8 plywood and then oak parquet floors.  All my efforts were not in vain but there is still significant noise that would wake/disturb someone downstairs.  I talked to a sound engineer i ran into at homedepot who suggested drop-channel ceilings.  He also told me to go online to find out more so here i am.  How much ceiling will i lose?
: : 2 layers of drywall at 8 STC points per layer is only 16- sounds like someone went on the cheap again.  Read below on how it should have been done.



Dan

  • Guest
Re: you guessed it, noisy upstairs
« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2002, 03:01:27 PM »

I used a layer of 5/8" drywall and a layer of quality soundboard, like you recommend, and had very disappointing results like Greg


BE WARY!


: SORRY- LOOKS LIKE YOU GOT THAT WRONG TOO!! We don't recommend double layers of the same materials, (Contractors do- they don't know any better), we recommend using different ones for reasons we explain over the phone to those who don't want to go off half-baked.  Also: To have any noticable difference would mean at least a real 50% sound reduction. It's be cause of the way we hear.  bj
: ======================================================
: : : : Don't expect much from a dropped ceiling. I installed one using the Super Sound Clips + Sound Proofing Tape + Acoutical Tape + two heavy layers of 5/8" drywall and it made maybe a 25-30% difference. Certainly not worth the time and expense, IMHO.
: : : : Dan
: : : : : Bob, I have a duplex(upper/lower) and have covered the upstairs hardwoods with (in this order)foam underlayment(approx.1/16" like pergo regular underlay),>1/4" soft ikea waferboard, 3/8 plywood and then oak parquet floors.  All my efforts were not in vain but there is still significant noise that would wake/disturb someone downstairs.  I talked to a sound engineer i ran into at homedepot who suggested drop-channel ceilings.  He also told me to go online to find out more so here i am.  How much ceiling will i lose?
: : : 2 layers of drywall at 8 STC points per layer is only 16- sounds like someone went on the cheap again.  Read below on how it should have been done.




bjnash

  • Guest
Re: you guessed it, noisy upstairs
« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2002, 04:50:38 PM »
:

I used a layer of 5/8" drywall and a layer of quality soundboard, like you recommend, and had very disappointing results like Greg


:

BE WARY!


Wary?  Yes- I'd say be wary of the advice of "Dan" and "Greg"-  They can't seem to tell us what they did right- first it's the one way we recommended, then it's another way we recommended- read their previous messages.  This ain't smoke and mirrors folks,  as "Greg" and "Dan" would have you believe.  Each of these products have a STC rating and these ratings are additive- so when you finish your sound control wall or ceiling, it will have the sound control you built into it- no more and no less.  So if you start with a standard wall of about STC 20 (a wall with sheet rock and 2X4's: and add resiient channel (STC of 20) then a layer of sound board-(STC of 10)then a layer of MLV (Mass Loaded Vinyl or lead) figure a STC of aroun 21-26.  Finish with a layer of sheet rock and even a child can figure the rating of that assembley would be the sum of it's parts (and even better) So a STC of 60 or so means that loud shouting would not normally be heard- assuming you did it right and did'nt leave any of the elements of your assembley out.  But an STC of around 60 is not a big deal: if you're playing acid rock at full volume- don't blame the wall when your neighbors call the cops.  And if you listened to us with half an ear, did a sloppy job, didn't caulk well and half-assed it with big gaps in the fitting of your panels, etc, don't blame us for bad advice.  BJ


: : SORRY- LOOKS LIKE YOU GOT THAT WRONG TOO!! We don't recommend double layers of the same materials, (Contractors do- they don't know any better), we recommend using different ones for reasons we explain over the phone to those who don't want to go off half-baked.  Also: To have any noticable difference would mean at least a real 50% sound reduction. It's be cause of the way we hear.  bj

: : ======================================================
: : : : : Don't expect much from a dropped ceiling. I installed one using the Super Sound Clips + Sound Proofing Tape + Acoutical Tape + two heavy layers of 5/8" drywall and it made maybe a 25-30% difference. Certainly not worth the time and expense, IMHO.
: : : : : Dan
: : : : : : Bob, I have a duplex(upper/lower) and have covered the upstairs hardwoods with (in this order)foam underlayment(approx.1/16" like pergo regular underlay),>1/4" soft ikea waferboard, 3/8 plywood and then oak parquet floors.  All my efforts were not in vain but there is still significant noise that would wake/disturb someone downstairs.  I talked to a sound engineer i ran into at homedepot who suggested drop-channel ceilings.  He also told me to go online to find out more so here i am.  How much ceiling will i lose?
: : : : 2 layers of drywall at 8 STC points per layer is only 16- sounds like someone went on the cheap again.  Read below on how it should have been done.




Steve Gibbons

  • Guest
Re: you guessed it, noisy upstairs
« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2002, 05:37:30 PM »
To people considering a soundproofing.org product:
I certainly would be wary. In my 53 years I've never seen a company head treat his customers (whether they're satisfied or unsatisfied) with such disrespect. I have no knowledge as to whether your products do what they claim, but your attitute and senseless bickering certainly makes me wary.
Steve



tom

  • Guest
Re: you guessed it, noisy upstairs
« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2002, 05:54:39 PM »
Actually, if you look at your instructions for the super sound clips (http://www.soundproofing.org/sales/supersoundclip/supersoundclip.htm) there is no mention of avoiding double layers of the same material. Infact quite the opposite.
Here's a quote from the step by step instructions:
"Space Hat Channel No More Than ... [for] Gypsum Board ... and No More Than ... for additional (second layer) ... Gypsum Board."



: SORRY- LOOKS LIKE YOU GOT THAT WRONG TOO!! We don't recommend double layers of the same materials, (Contractors do- they don't know any better), we recommend using different ones for reasons we explain over the phone to those who don't want to go off half-baked.  Also: To have any noticable difference would mean at least a real 50% sound reduction. It's be cause of the way we hear.  bj
: ======================================================
: : : : Don't expect much from a dropped ceiling. I installed one using the Super Sound Clips + Sound Proofing Tape + Acoutical Tape + two heavy layers of 5/8" drywall and it made maybe a 25-30% difference. Certainly not worth the time and expense, IMHO.
: : : : Dan
: : : : : Bob, I have a duplex(upper/lower) and have covered the upstairs hardwoods with (in this order)foam underlayment(approx.1/16" like pergo regular underlay),>1/4" soft ikea waferboard, 3/8 plywood and then oak parquet floors.  All my efforts were not in vain but there is still significant noise that would wake/disturb someone downstairs.  I talked to a sound engineer i ran into at homedepot who suggested drop-channel ceilings.  He also told me to go online to find out more so here i am.  How much ceiling will i lose?
: : : 2 layers of drywall at 8 STC points per layer is only 16- sounds like someone went on the cheap again.  Read below on how it should have been done.



bjnash

  • Guest
Re: you guessed it, noisy upstairs
« Reply #9 on: May 03, 2002, 06:41:46 PM »
: To people considering a soundproofing.org product:
: I certainly would be wary. In my 53 years I've never seen a company head treat his customers (whether they're satisfied or unsatisfied) with such disrespect. I have no knowledge as to whether your products do what they claim, but your attitute and senseless bickering certainly makes me wary.
: Steve
We have to act when false and misleading information is posted otherwise people will accept it if not refuted.  Sorry you take it as "senseless bickering" but we strive to keep the record straight and bear in mind we have some  competitors who leave unfriendly messages here too... Maybe like you where one negative reply isn't enough- is it 53 years you haven't seen it or 30 years (your other message) you haven't seen it?


Greg

  • Guest
Re: you guessed it, noisy upstairs
« Reply #10 on: May 03, 2002, 06:48:26 PM »
I wouldn't complain about what was obviously a simple typo, especially considering that all four of your reply sentences are ungrammatical!
: We have to act when false and misleading information is posted otherwise people will accept it if not refuted.  Sorry you take it as "senseless bickering" but we strive to keep the record straight and bear in mind we have some  competitors who leave unfriendly messages here too... Maybe like you where one negative reply isn't enough- is it 53 years you haven't seen it or 30 years (your other message) you haven't seen it?



Steve Gibbons

  • Guest
Re: you guessed it, noisy upstairs
« Reply #11 on: May 03, 2002, 07:35:48 PM »
This just reaffirms what I was trying to say. A very unprofessional attack by Mr. Nash. I'm 53 years old and have been involved in sales for the last 30 years.
Sorry for the typo, but that's not really the point, is it?
: Maybe like you where one negative reply isn't enough- is it 53 years you haven't seen it or 30 years (your other message) you haven't seen it?<



.

  • Guest
Re: you guessed it, noisy upstairs
« Reply #12 on: August 28, 2002, 04:04:21 PM »
pergo

pergo



I found the best place for pergo! They have the lowest prices and largest number of products.




pergo
http://www.designerwoodfloors.com/pergo-flooring.html

:

SORRY- LOOKS LIKE YOU GOT THAT WRONG TOO!! We don't recommend double layers of the same materials, (Contractors do- they don't know any better), we recommend using different ones for reasons we explain over the phone to those who don't want to go off half-baked.  Also: To have any noticable difference would mean at least a real 50% sound reduction. It's be cause of the way we hear.  bj
: ======================================================
: : : : Don't expect much from a dropped ceiling. I installed one using the Super Sound Clips + Sound Proofing Tape + Acoutical Tape + two heavy layers of 5/8" drywall and it made maybe a 25-30% difference. Certainly not worth the time and expense, IMHO.
: : : : Dan
: : : : : Bob, I have a duplex(upper/lower) and have covered the upstairs hardwoods with (in this order)foam underlayment(approx.1/16" like pergo regular underlay),>1/4" soft ikea waferboard, 3/8 plywood and then oak parquet floors.  All my efforts were not in vain but there is still significant noise that would wake/disturb someone downstairs.  I talked to a sound engineer i ran into at homedepot who suggested drop-channel ceilings.  He also told me to go online to find out more so here i am.  How much ceiling will i lose?
: : : 2 layers of drywall at 8 STC points per layer is only 16- sounds like someone went on the cheap again.  Read below on how it should have been done.




 

anything