Author Topic: rattling steam radiator pipe  (Read 5891 times)

Viv

  • Guest
rattling steam radiator pipe
« on: December 21, 2002, 12:41:53 AM »
There is a rattling noise coming from the metal input valve to the steam radiator in my apartment. It sounds like there might be a washer loose inside the pipe and it is rattling around. Unfortunately, my super is not very cooperative about fixing it because it's not terribly loud, but I am a very light sleeper and need to do something about it. What is my best option for sound proofing the valve, considering that it gets very hot? Do I need to sound proof the whole radiator? The radiator itself is enclosed in a metal casing. Do I need to sound proof the casing as well? Thanks for your advise.


boborther

  • Guest
Re: rattling steam radiator pipe
« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2002, 05:15:18 PM »
Viv,
Due to the valve getting so hot, you might consider having a small enclosure built that goes over the valve, but does not make direct contact with it. You would then treat the inside of this enclosure with a closed cell foam mat. This would help to absorb and block much of the clanking sounds coming from the valve.
Viv, this is going to take some creativity on your part, but it is not "Rocket Science". What you are doing it blocking the noise at it's source, which is the best way by far to combat irratating noises which are confined to small areas. Treating the noise at it's source is usually the best way to soundproof and generally the most economical. Thanks for the interesting post, as winter looms, stream pipe noise becomes and increasingly more common problem, particularly in older buildings.
Bob O.
boborther@soundproofing.org
www.soundproofing.org
(760) 749-7049
for orders only (888) 942-7723


Viv

  • Guest
Re: rattling steam radiator pipe
« Reply #2 on: December 22, 2002, 02:47:59 AM »
Thanks for the advice. That sounds do-able. What material would you suggest I use to build the enclosure?
Thanks,
Viv
: Viv,
:  Due to the valve getting so hot, you might consider having a small enclosure built that goes over the valve, but does not make direct contact with it. You would then treat the inside of this enclosure with a closed cell foam mat. This would help to absorb and block much of the clanking sounds coming from the valve.
:  Viv, this is going to take some creativity on your part, but it is not "Rocket Science". What you are doing it blocking the noise at it's source, which is the best way by far to combat irratating noises which are confined to small areas. Treating the noise at it's source is usually the best way to soundproof and generally the most economical. Thanks for the interesting post, as winter looms, stream pipe noise becomes and increasingly more common problem, particularly in older buildings.
: Bob O.
: boborther@soundproofing.org
: www.soundproofing.org
: (760) 749-7049
: for orders only (888) 942-7723




 

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