Author Topic: Quasi-Industrial Fan to Mask Sound  (Read 2473 times)

Andrew Morgan

  • Guest
Quasi-Industrial Fan to Mask Sound
« on: March 17, 2003, 11:00:36 PM »
Hi gang,
While it can be very costly to actually control the "compressions & rarefactions" that create sound waves, a very inexpensive way to control the *effect* of unwanted sound is to use a large fan.  Unwanted noise is the difference between the loudness of the "incoming sound" and the loudness of usual background noise in your room, usually around 30-35dB.  For example, if a neighboring dog's barking creates an 75dB sound in your room, the net affect on you is 75-35 = 40dB.  By using a good quality fan (that doesn't rattle) you can raise the "usual" background noise by a good 20-30 dB.  So, when the 75dB barking enters your room, your fan has raised the background noise level of your room to almost the same 75dB, thereby drowning out the barking.  Although the sound levels of the fan & barking are similar, the sound of your fan is much more pleasant than someone's dog.  I have been routinely sleeping with a large fan in my bedroom for over 10 years now, and am hardly ever woken up by outside noise.  Also, over the years, several sleeping-over girlfriends who originally said they could not sleep with a fan running quickly grew accustomed to the sound and bought fans of their own.  Try it!!!
   


Dave

  • Guest
Re: Quasi-Industrial Fan to Mask Sound
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2003, 12:03:16 PM »
I know someone who does the same thing. She swears by it!
Dave

: Hi gang,
: While it can be very costly to actually control the "compressions & rarefactions" that create sound waves, a very inexpensive way to control the *effect* of unwanted sound is to use a large fan.  Unwanted noise is the difference between the loudness of the "incoming sound" and the loudness of usual background noise in your room, usually around 30-35dB.  For example, if a neighboring dog's barking creates an 75dB sound in your room, the net affect on you is 75-35 = 40dB.  By using a good quality fan (that doesn't rattle) you can raise the "usual" background noise by a good 20-30 dB.  So, when the 75dB barking enters your room, your fan has raised the background noise level of your room to almost the same 75dB, thereby drowning out the barking.  Although the sound levels of the fan & barking are similar, the sound of your fan is much more pleasant than someone's dog.  I have been routinely sleeping with a large fan in my bedroom for over 10 years now, and am hardly ever woken up by outside noise.  Also, over the years, several sleeping-over girlfriends who originally said they could not sleep with a fan running quickly grew accustomed to the sound and bought fans of their own.  Try it!!!
:    



boborther

  • Guest
Re: Quasi-Industrial Fan to Mask Sound
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2003, 02:05:02 AM »
: Hi gang,
: While it can be very costly to actually control the "compressions & rarefactions" that create sound waves, a very inexpensive way to control the *effect* of unwanted sound is to use a large fan.  Unwanted noise is the difference between the loudness of the "incoming sound" and the loudness of usual background noise in your room, usually around 30-35dB.  For example, if a neighboring dog's barking creates an 75dB sound in your room, the net affect on you is 75-35 = 40dB.  By using a good quality fan (that doesn't rattle) you can raise the "usual" background noise by a good 20-30 dB.  So, when the 75dB barking enters your room, your fan has raised the background noise level of your room to almost the same 75dB, thereby drowning out the barking.  Although the sound levels of the fan & barking are similar, the sound of your fan is much more pleasant than someone's dog.  I have been routinely sleeping with a large fan in my bedroom for over 10 years now, and am hardly ever woken up by outside noise.  Also, over the years, several sleeping-over girlfriends who originally said they could not sleep with a fan running quickly grew accustomed to the sound and bought fans of their own.  Try it!!!
:  

Andrew,
Your point about the fan is well taken. What you are doing with the fan is much like what others do with a "white noise filter".
Andrew, I appreciate you helpful input.


Bob Orther
Super Soundproofing Sales/Technical Associate.
Ph: (760) 749-7049    FAX: (760) 749-6384
URL: www.soundproofing.org
e-mail: boborther@soundproofing.org
For orders only (888) 942-7723




 

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