Author Topic: Urgent-Old horsehair plaster walls and busy street  (Read 3062 times)

Julie

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Urgent-Old horsehair plaster walls and busy street
« on: March 21, 2003, 09:43:22 AM »
Hi. I have found this site to be most informative and useful, just when I was about to give up on ever solving my noise problem--thanks Bob O. for all your help! Although I went through all 15 pages of posts, I did not see any postings that would relate to my problem. I recently bought an old house which has the old lathe and horsehair plaster walls in many rooms esp. ones facing the busy street we are on. Now, we will be doing some renovations anyhow and were planning on replacing the ugly and uneven plaster walls with nice and smooth drywall. However our drywall guy recommended that we do not rip out the horsehair (because it would be very messy, dusty and a lot of work) but rather put the drywall right on top of it. I have been reading a lot of Bob O.'s answers and it seems to me that putting up 1/8" MLV before putting up 5/8" drywall has been recommended many times. My question is, can the above go over the existing horsehair plaster walls? Or is there a better option to deal with the problem in this specific case? Again, the noise is traffic noise, and seems to me like low frequency vibrations coming from the acceleration of cars as they try to gain speed uphill in front of our house after they stop at the light 100 yards down the road. Thank you very much; I would really appreciate your opinions asap, as we are getting ready to start the renovations.


boborther

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Re: Urgent-Old horsehair plaster walls and busy street
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2003, 12:16:41 AM »
: Hi. I have found this site to be most informative and useful, just when I was about to give up on ever solving my noise problem--thanks Bob O. for all your help! Although I went through all 15 pages of posts, I did not see any postings that would relate to my problem. I recently bought an old house which has the old lathe and horsehair plaster walls in many rooms esp. ones facing the busy street we are on. Now, we will be doing some renovations anyhow and were planning on replacing the ugly and uneven plaster walls with nice and smooth drywall. However our drywall guy recommended that we do not rip out the horsehair (because it would be very messy, dusty and a lot of work) but rather put the drywall right on top of it. I have been reading a lot of Bob O.'s answers and it seems to me that putting up 1/8" MLV before putting up 5/8" drywall has been recommended many times. My question is, can the above go over the existing horsehair plaster walls? Or is there a better option to deal with the problem in this specific case? Again, the noise is traffic noise, and seems to me like low frequency vibrations coming from the acceleration of cars as they try to gain speed uphill in front of our house after they stop at the light 100 yards down the road. Thank you very much; I would really appreciate your opinions asap, as we are getting ready to start the renovations.


Julie,
I really appreciate the kind words. Your contractor was right about the hard work and the mess of removing the lathe and plaster walls.
The reason we suggest removing the old walls is that we recommend working from the bare studs in a wall or bare joists in a ceiling. That way you are able to utilize the dead air space that would be behind your plaster walls or ceilings. This dead air space works for you in your soundproofing efforts. Now keep in mind that this dead air space needs to be sealed off. That can be done with the adherence of some of our closed cell foam mat glued into the cavities of the wall, and also around the studs as well. This helps to seal off the dead air space and also offers some needed vibration dampening in these areas.
After lining the cavities and studs with the foam, you can then either float the new wall, or simply re install your drywall, and apply a layer of Mass loaded vinyl (MLV) stapling it to the drywall. Lastly you would install a final layer of 5/8" fire code drywall, then tape mud and paint as desired. Lead sheeting is also an option in lieu of the (MLV).
These techniques and others are described in detail on the website www.soundproofing.org so feel free to browse the site. Thanks for the post.

Bob Orther
Super Soundproofing Sales/Technical Associate.
Ph: (760) 749-7049    FAX: (760) 749-6384
URL: www.soundproofing.org
e-mail: boborther@soundproofing.org
For orders only (888) 942-7723