Author Topic: Traffic noise behind the home  (Read 57878 times)

Gary Keller

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Re: Traffic noise behind the home
« Reply #15 on: November 10, 2005, 02:57:22 AM »
Hello and thank you for reading my note. By the way, you have a very informative web site here!

I have a condo on a busy street in Sarasota, FL.  My condo association requires the same exterior appearance of my two sliding glass doors and my two regular windows.  Also, since the hurricanes have come through Florida, I understand our county code requires any new windows to be up to hurricane code.

My questions are three fold:
1.      What suggestion(s) can you make to reduce noise from a busy road that my condo faces in a townhouse condo that takes up the second and third level?
2.      If you suggest new windows, is there a resource, such as a web site or magazine that ranks the top noise reducing windows and good installers in the area?
3.      Finally how can I check to see if the cost of the job is fair?

Thanks in advance for any and all thoughts.

pave-low

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Re: Traffic noise behind the home
« Reply #16 on: November 16, 2005, 04:58:15 PM »
Most people just use ¼” or thicker tempered glass.  A good installation and caulk job around the frame will yield an amazing amount of sound dampening.  Retail on the glass is about $8.00/sqft. I wouldn’t pay more than $6.00/sqft. (your glass guy is still making money at that price). Installation should be between $50-75 per operable window depending on the size/height off the ground, and the size of the total job. Make sure they know why you want the thick glass.  They will install double wipers, etc. to help the sound-proofing.  To find a good contractor you can always ask them for some people in your neighborhood that have either had impact glass installed or just regular windows.

I am totally sold on Impact glass for sound dampening.
8)

coffee1

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Re: Traffic noise behind the home
« Reply #17 on: February 08, 2007, 12:55:41 AM »
 I also live near a very busy freeway. The truck noise is driving us crazy. I tried installing a piece of trempered glass inside the window jam of my bedroom window. The tempered glass only helped slightly. Three sides of my home are brick, but the rear that faces the freeway in vinyl siding. Could the siding be a part of the problem? If necessary I'm willing to remove the siding and install something that would cut the down the noise. Would installing a noise barrier then re installing the siding help? Would replacing the siding with stucco make a noticable difference? I love my home so, I willing to try almost anything.

bjnash

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Re: Traffic noise behind the home
« Reply #18 on: February 08, 2007, 05:36:15 AM »
Remember, windows usually pass more sound than walls- let your ears test the difference.
See
http://soundproofing.org/options_sound_control_for_windows.htm

BN Nash

johnbergstromslc

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Re: Traffic noise behind the home
« Reply #19 on: February 09, 2007, 02:27:56 AM »
Tempered glass doesn't help much.  What you need is Laminated glass.  The plastic interlayer is what breaks the vibration (and the noise).  Stucco would be quieter than vinyl siding (especially if you caulked up the seams and penetrations in your sheathing first), but focus on quieting the windows and doors first.

coffee1

  • Guest
Re: Traffic noise behind the home
« Reply #20 on: February 09, 2007, 04:38:55 AM »
Remember, windows usually pass more sound than walls- let your ears test the difference.
See
http://soundproofing.org/options_sound_control_for_windows.htm

BN Nash
I took you suggestion and let me ears do the testing. I put an ear against the wall that faces the freeway, the one with the vinyl siding. I could hear as much noise as the windows. I actually could fell the drywall vibrating as the tractor trailer trucks came by. I tried the same test on one of my side walls that has brick on the outside, huge difference.  Almost no noise penetrated the wall with the brick exterior. I understand that I will also have to address the windows, but the wall seems to allow as much noise through. I know installing brick is not an option. Do you have any other suggestions? Will hardi planking in place of the vinyl siding help?

johnbergstromslc

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Re: Traffic noise behind the home
« Reply #21 on: February 10, 2007, 12:37:35 AM »
You might want to try doubling up the drywall with Green Glue.  It would be far easier and cheaper than replacing the siding.

coffee1

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Re: Traffic noise behind the home
« Reply #22 on: February 13, 2007, 08:13:06 PM »
I'm willing to try adding another layer of drywall but, that will require floating and texturing. I'll have no experience in either, so I'll need to hire someone that does. However, I have installed siding before. By trying an option that would involve the siding would be easier and probably cheaper than a drywall option. Is MLV beneath by siding an effective option? Currently, beneath my sidng is a very thin layer of insulating wrap that covers a layer of OSB. Is MLV beneath by siding an effective option? Can the MLV be nailed directly over the wrap and OSB? Or would I need to install furring strips to create an air gap then reinstall the siding? My concern about adding furring strips is the increased thichness and would that create a problem with the siding around my windows?

Just FYI. I fabricated a window plug for my master bedroom using 3/4" MDF with 1" carpet padding glued to the back. This pug did reduce the noise some. But, my bedroom still is very noisy. Do you thing this type of window plug is as effective as a layer of laminated glass?

johnbergstromslc

  • Guest
Re: Traffic noise behind the home
« Reply #23 on: February 14, 2007, 02:40:05 AM »
Well, MLV would help, but installing furring strips with an air gap would be a lot more effective.  MLV runs $1.50/sq/ft., minimum, so to cover a 4' X 8' area would be $48.  Drywall is only $10 for a 5/8" sheet, and you could easily learn to mud and texture.  Your call, though.

The plug you made sounds like it's helping, but I don't think it's as effective as laminated glass.  1/4" laminated has roughly an equal density as 3/4" MDF, but it deadens sound much better, due to the vibration-breaking effect of the inner plastic layer.   

sandmansf

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Re: Traffic noise behind the home
« Reply #24 on: December 01, 2007, 10:47:54 PM »

bjnash

  • Guest
Re: Traffic noise behind the home
« Reply #25 on: January 19, 2008, 03:22:03 AM »
Found some links that I thought might prove useful:
http://massloadedvinyl.blogspot.com/2005/07/building-soundproof-fence.html

http://www.homefrontfence.com

Thanks for your post, but such fences will not be effective unless very high- 14' or better as the sound bubble will roll right over a 8' fence.


sparsonsusa

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Re: Traffic noise behind the home
« Reply #26 on: January 27, 2008, 11:41:08 PM »
My traffic is in front of my home and because I'm set on a hill, I'd have to build a 20' tall fence (which isn't allowed). My house is 20' away from a busy street on a hill (think low gear) in a canyon (echo!). The noise isn't constant, just enough to discern the difference from very loud and quiet. I find it unusual that I can hear every passing car, person, dog, or leaf from inside my home. I recently got new windows with a STC rating of 32. They did nothing, zip, nada to reduce the noise. It was at the moment I decided to sell, then the housing market crashed (so, I have to stay for a while). So, I'm backing to finding a solution. I have a stucco house, raised foundation, wood floors, plaster & lath walls (built in 1951). My noise problem is 100% automobile, with a great majority the "boom boom" cars with really low base shaking the pictures off the walls every few minutes. I can hear them from half a mile in either direction of my house and that doesn't seem right. I even have to turn up the TV to compete from them. Other peoples' homes don't seem as noisy as mine.
I'd swear noise was coming through the walls, ceiling, and floor, but can't tell. I'm very skeptical about ripping any walls down and rebuilding them with special drywall, but I'm willing to entertain any ideas. I have a budget of about 1k, perhaps to just address the three bedrooms. Is that even reasonable?
Thanks,
Scott

Mark Daveis

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Re: Traffic noise behind the home
« Reply #27 on: January 29, 2008, 11:23:31 PM »
Hi,
Wherever there is low mass - roof,walls,windows the sound and definitely bass will penetrate so check everything - walls, roof floor. They ALL have to have enough mass to stop the sound. A double glazed window has only about 10 to 15 kg/msq of unit mass so wont stop that much so you either have to increase the mass of weak areas or use an air space with less mass.
On the cheap you could buy concrete blocks and cement and do the walls and use say thick mdf or chip board to treat the roof/floor and if you have enough mass you should get good results. First thing you should do is get a sound meter and measure the decibels and amount of bass noise before deciding what to do. :)

sparsonsusa

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Re: Traffic noise behind the home
« Reply #28 on: February 03, 2008, 11:29:58 PM »
Thank you for your reply. I like the suggestion about a sound meter. I'll start my search now.
I just visited a home with a set of soundproof windows over a set of double-pane windows. I was impressed with the results. That house, though, had 9" thick exterior walls. So, I'm not sure if it would help that much in my house. The house was overlooking a freeway (on top of it, if you asked me), so the noise was constant.
Nevertheless, having not considered the "mass" factor before, I'm going to look into those manufactured stone facades you can put on your house. I looked at them previously for aesthetic reasons, but now can see the practical. It'd add about 2" of stone to my house, although I'd only have it go up to the windows.
One thing about the windows I bought, I can now say they do keep out the higher-pitched noises. So, it's just the rumbling of the cars.
Thanks again for your help,
Scott

Mark Daveis

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Re: Traffic noise behind the home
« Reply #29 on: February 05, 2008, 08:33:11 PM »
Only two things really matter in soundproofing and thats mass and isolation.
High pitched sounds have less energy (unless very loud) so can be stopped with just a fair amount of mass.
2 inches of stone will add quite a bit of mass to youir walls but remember to look at the roof and windows/doors as well as the sound will just pass through there if they are not treated as well but all can be done cheaply with standard DIY materials. :)