Author Topic: Building that Recording Studio or Home Theater  (Read 5276 times)

Boborther

  • Guest
Building that Recording Studio or Home Theater
« on: April 23, 2003, 11:22:43 PM »
 [glb]



How do I build a Home recording studio, or a home theater in my basement or garage?

This is surely one of the most commonly asked questions that I field on a daily basis. For the best results, I always recommend building a "Room within a Room". This method makes soundproofing much easier and much more economical. It also allows you to use the dead air space in your basement or garage for extra soundproofing protection. Whether you float the walls and ceiling, or simply layer the walls and ceiling with mass loaded vinyls (MLV), we will do our best to help you achieve the soundproofing and sound conditioning that will give you professional results. Please feel free to post your questions on soundproof practice rooms, voice over rooms, and  recording studios right here in this forum.

I am also a musician, so I understand the needs of my fellow players to have a quiet and secure place to play and record. Nuff said??





Thanks gang!!

Bob Orther
Super Soundproofing Sales/Technical Associate.
Ph: (760) 749-7049    FAX: (760) 749-6384
URL: www.soundproofing.org
e-mail: boborther@soundproofing.org
For orders only (888) 942-7723[/glb]

Boborther

  • Guest
Post your Recording Studio or Home Theater stories
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2003, 06:04:08 PM »
Hey Gang,

Many of the calls this past month have been in reference to building a garage or basement home studio. I would appreciate hearing any and all success stories on these home built studios. Please post your success or failure stories here on this forum. If it keeps someone from making a costly mistake, it is well worth your time and effort. Thanks for reading and posting to this forum. It  helps people that have no clue where to turn for soundproofing advice and information.

Bob Orther
Super Soundproofing Sales/Technical Associate.
Ph: (760) 749-7049    FAX: (760) 749-6384
URL: www.soundproofing.org
e-mail: boborther@soundproofing.org
For orders only (888) 942-7723

Ed

  • Guest
Re: Building that Recording Studio or Home Theater
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2003, 02:42:24 AM »
Hi folks:



Could use some advice from someone who's seen this problem before... I can't believe it's unique.  Sorry if this is posted in the wrong spot, but I can't see a better place to put it...



We're building a home theater demo room inside an existing furniture store.  The demo room will be 14 ft. wide X 24 ft. long X 10 ft. high.  The existing store has a drop ceiling at ~12 ft. with all the normal stuff -- heating/ A-C outlet, ventilation into the drop ceiling, etc. so of course there's a gap between their drop ceiling and the top of our ceiling.  We're pondering the problem of getting ventilation into the demo room.  The store currently has 14" flexible hose leading to grates mounted in the ceiling that disperse the air in all directions.  We were planning to extend one of those hoses into our theater, (since we prefer to breathe)...



1.  Does anyone have any ideas that would be better than using the existing ventilation system in the store to heat/cool the demo theater?



2.  How do we keep sound from blasting up through the 14" hose to the rest of the store via the ventilation system?



Any help/thoughts appreciated...

Boborther

  • Guest
Re: Building that Recording Studio or Home Theater
« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2003, 04:51:12 PM »
Ed,

The dropped ceiling is a big problem when it comes to soundproofing. They are great for sound conditioning, but are the absolute pits for soundproofing. In your demo room, you are actually going to need to joist out a new ceiling to get the soundproofing horsepower you'll need for your media room.
When constructing a home theater or a media room, you'll  need  as much serious soundproofing as possible, especially in a store front environment.
Like I said previously, I would joist out a new ceiling and axe that drop ceiling altogether, then I would layer the new ceiling and the existing walls with a layer of the Mass Loaded Vinyl (MLV) that would be stapled to your existing walls and the new ceiling. You'd caulk the seams and all the way around the perimeter with an acoustical caulk, and then  layer that over with a layer of 5/8" firecode drywall, tape mud and paint, and presto!! you have a soundproofed media room or home theater.
It is not Rocket Science, but there are certain soundproofing rules that must be followed for this to work effectively.
Ed, if you need further advice or information, please do not hesitate to call. These soundproofing methods and systems do indeed work. Thanks for your post.

Sincerely,

Bob Orther
(The Bob Vila of Soundproofing)
Super Soundproofing Sales/Technical Associate.
Ph: (760) 752-3030    FAX: (760) 752-3040
URL: www.soundproofing.org
e-mail: boborther@soundproofing.org
Orders only (888) 942-7723
When Peace of Mind is all that Matters!