Author Topic: Impact noise  (Read 4829 times)

Philip Regan

  • Guest
Impact noise
« on: April 24, 2003, 12:39:56 AM »
I'm on the 3rd floor of a approx. 100 y.o. building. My office is a small 6'x12' space that has hardwood floors. I have an electronic drumkit that, when I play, creates impact noise from the pads and kick pedals. I'd like to find a way to lessen the noise for my neighbors downstairs (who have been gracious enough to agree to late practice times).



Voices and footsteps aren't a problem (they have a baby that we can't even hear when she's crying, and we're usually barefoot or "slippered"), just the hard and fast hitting of the rubber and plastic drum pads seems to be the problem.



The drum kit is a hollow aluminum rack system that has four rubber feet that extend may a 1/2" beyond the bottom, horizontal leg, but the kick and hi-hat pedals sit directly on the floor and are all at least 14" in length. The kit currently sits on a small 2.75'x 4' scrap of carpet to protect the floor.



There are some restrictions to whatever solution is offered up (in order of importance):

-- I'd like something that would fit in the area of a small rug (approx. 4'x6').

-- I have to get to materials under a dormer beyond the kit area, so raising the kit too high is an issue, as is stability while playing.

-- Also, we're only planning on being there for a few more years, so nothing permanent.

-- Also, anything that would allow me to play late at night would be keen, and I'd like to keep an eye (or an ear maybe?) to a sound system with a subwoofer I might be putting in there as well, so I can possibly expand the flooring solution. Though, this must meet my wife's approval (heh).

-- Cost is not a major issue, but I'd like something reasonable.



I've heard SSP floormats, mass loaded vinyl, and vibration pads thrown around a lot. But I'm not sure as to which to buy. Any advice, Mr. Bob O. (or anyone else for that matter)? I'd be happy to call and talk with you directly if the explanation is easier over the phone. Thanks!


Boborther

  • Guest
Re: Impact noise
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2003, 05:12:15 PM »
Phil,

You have the right idea with the floormat and the vibration pads. Even though it is not an acoustical drum kit you are correct in your estimation of the impact noise and the effects on the neighbors below. The floormat should cover the entire area of the floor, (wall to wall)
It would be helpful  if you were to build a small drum riser, that would get the kit off of the hardwood floor. This riser could also be soundproofed using the closed cell vinyl nitrile foams that we carry here.
Phil, the key is to decouple the drum kit from the floor below. The floormat could easily go beneath an area rug for some extra protection.
You will need to use a little bit of inginuity and creativity here Phil, but this can be done and prduce good results. Please feel free to give me a call and we can discuss your situation in detail.

Thanks Phil.

Bob Orther
Super Soundproofing Sales/Technical Associate.
Ph: (760) 749-7049    FAX: (760) 749-6384
URL: www.soundproofing.org
e-mail: boborther@soundproofing.org
For orders only (888) 942-7723

Philip Regan

  • Guest
Re: Impact noise
« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2003, 11:57:47 AM »
Quote
Phil,

 You have the right idea with the floormat and the vibration pads. Even though it is not an acoustical drum kit you are correct in your estimation of the impact noise and the effects on the neighbors below. The floormat should cover the entire area of the floor, (wall to wall)

 It would be helpful  if you were to build a small drum riser, that would get the kit off of the hardwood floor. This riser could also be soundproofed using the closed cell vinyl nitrile foams that we carry here.

 Phil, the key is to decouple the drum kit from the floor below. The floormat could easily go beneath an area rug for some extra protection.

 You will need to use a little bit of inginuity and creativity here Phil, but this can be done and prduce good results. Please feel free to give me a call and we can discuss your situation in detail.

 Thanks Phil.
Bob Orther
Super Soundproofing Sales/Technical Associate.
Ph: (760) 749-7049    FAX: (760) 749-6384
URL: www.soundproofing.org
e-mail: boborther@soundproofing.org
For orders only (888) 942-7723


Actually, if I could ask just a couple quick questions, the phone call might be delayed until I need to place an order.  ;D

1. How high do you think the riser should be? I'd like to keep it down to a couple inches if at all possible.

2. What thickness MLV should I get? I was thinking it would make sense to use two layers of MLV, one as a foundation for the riser, and second to go directly underneath the drumkit.

3. Would I need something to fill in the space under the riser, or should I leave it open? Is that where the closed cell vinyl nitrile foams come in to play?

4. Are there some basic principles I should avoid when building the riser? The kit weighs maybe 100 lbs fully loaded, but I would not be sitting on it directly, just stepping (stomping) on the kick pedals.

If these questions are more easily answerable by phone, I can call early next week. Thanks, Bob!

Philip

Boborther

  • Guest
Re: Impact noise
« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2003, 11:32:35 PM »
Phil,



It was great talking to over the phone. I think I answered most of your questions at that time, but for the benefit of our readers, I will go ahead and answer your questions.
The riser can be only a few inches off the floor and still be effective. The main objective is to get the drum kit off of the floor, it really doesn't matter how far off the floor, just as long as it is off the floor.
The (MLV) only comes in one thickness, and that is 1/8". It does not need to be any thicker. It was designed to emulate lead foil, and it does a remarkable job of doing that.
The closed cell foam would be the ticket for the underneath areas of the riser.
And lastly, avoid wood as much as possible when building the riser, but if there is no other choice, cover as much of the wood as possible with the closed cell foam mat. That will negate any adverse affects of the wood. Wood does transmit sound quite readily.

Thanks Phil,  keep on a drummin...



Bob Orther
Super Soundproofing Sales/Technical Associate.
Ph: (760) 749-7049    FAX: (760) 749-6384
URL: www.soundproofing.org
e-mail: boborther@soundproofing.org
For orders only (888) 942-7723

susan everett

  • Guest
Re: Impact noise
« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2003, 09:51:38 PM »
Hi Phil ~

Did it work?

What are the neighbors saying?

Thanks much,

Susan

Boborther

  • Guest
Re: Impact noise
« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2003, 04:15:55 PM »
Sue,

 These techniques do indeed work. It is always a good idea to get the drum kit up onto a riser assembly, in order to decouple the impact noises from entering into the hardwood floor. (this is true for electronic drum kits as well as acoustic kits) This riser could also be set atop  vibration isolation pads which would further assist in the sound decoupling process.
Sue, a lot depends on how serious you are about soundproofing, and yes it also depends upon how much money you are willing to spend, but believe me, if there are products or materials out there that will soundproof and are not in our inventory, I will tell you about them as well. It is not just a money thing with us here at soundproofing.org. it's about resolving soundproofing issues. Thanks for your post Sue, and please give me a call if I can help you, the advice and information are free.

Bob Orther
Super Soundproofing Sales/Technical Associate.
Ph: (760) 749-7049    FAX: (760) 749-6384
URL: www.soundproofing.org
e-mail: boborther@soundproofing.org
For orders only (888) 942-7723


 

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