Author Topic: practice room  (Read 16104 times)

Tim Healey

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practice room
« on: June 15, 2003, 11:30:58 PM »
Hello

My band and I got threatened with the police by a neighbour today so we couldn't practice :(

So we now have to sound proof a tiny single car garage(our practice place).  I haven't measured it but basically we can just fit the four of us and our instruments in it at the moment.  We haven't got a lot to spend or a lot of space, have you got any ideas for us?  We will appreciate any help Thank you.



Tim H


Boborther

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Re: practice room
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2003, 08:17:06 PM »
Tim,

Your best bet would be to adhere (staple or glue) a material called Mass Loaded Vinyl to the walls and the ceiling of the garage, and then seal the seams with an acoustical caulk and the finally layer over the (MLV) with a layer of 5/8" fire code sheet rock, tape mud and paint the rock and you would be done. this will add about 34 STC (Sound Transmission Class) points to your existing walls and ceiling.
If you get the chance go to the home page and scroll down till you see a yellow box with different headers in it, click on the one that says "Band Practice" and read that information, it will help you greatly when soundproofing your garage. Good luck Tim, and thanks for the post.

http://www.soundproofing.org/infopages/garage.htm

Bob Orther
Super Soundproofing Sales/Technical Associate.
Ph: (760) 749-7049    FAX: (760) 749-6384
URL: www.soundproofing.org
e-mail: boborther@soun

Tugs McGroin

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Re: practice room
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2003, 01:19:27 AM »
Hi! :)

I understand the primary purpose of this site is to help people soundproof properly, and to sell the materials required to do so.  However, for those of us who are flat broke, what is the best half-assed approach? ??? I was thinking of begging for some plush carpet remnants and stapling them to the walls.  I would go with mattresses, but finding them is difficult and getting them home is a problem.  :-/ Are there any more effective free/cheap ways to cut down on the noise even a little?

Andrew

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Re: practice room
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2003, 04:29:43 AM »
carpets & old mattresses isn't going to cut it - it will not add any sound proofing

ML-vinyl is expensive, but 5/8 drywall is not so expensive.  Instead of using ML-vinyl - just double up on the drywall - 2 sheets - even better - 2 sheets plus mineral loaded roofing felt which is way way cheap at Home Depot - 2 layers of that is heaver & better than ML-vinyl.  

To really cut down the sound you need to build an inside wall - but that may be out of range price wise

Boborther

  • Guest
Re: practice room
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2003, 09:41:59 PM »
Tug and Andy,

I am not sure about the mineral loaded roofing material being twice as effective as the MLV. The MLV has an STC of 26, and rolled roofing generally has about a 7 to 9 STC.
Tug, if you have access to hay bales, they are a very good soundproofer as well as the rolled roofing materials and the 5/8" drywall.
 I am a guitar player myself, and I know what is like to be broke and to need a decent place to play that is soundproofed. Actually soundproofing on a budget is not all that difficult. I would stay away from wood as much as possible, and go with products such as Drywall, MDF, Soundboard and Homasote. These agents all work and help to build up the mass in your walls. Sure hope this helps, thanks for the input Andy!


Bob Orther
Super Soundproofing Sales/Technical Associate.
Ph: (760) 752-3030    FAX: (760) 752-3040
URL: www.soundproofing.org
e-mail: boborther@soundproofing.org
Orders only (888) 942-7723
When Peace of Mind is all that Matters!

Greg Farrell

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Re: practice room
« Reply #5 on: August 18, 2003, 03:33:54 PM »
Hi

I have a problem with my bands practise room we live in an apartment building so we need to some how sound proof the floor, roof and sides. Yet we need to soundproof the room yet also be able to take what ever we put up down and totally remove it from the room without to much hassle. Money is quite a big issue. So we were hoping there would be some sort of magic soundproofing carpet to buy or something that could be moved easily. Please help.

Thank you so much

Boborther

  • Guest
Re: practice room
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2003, 11:29:25 PM »
Greg,

The best magic carpet we have is the mass loaded vinyl (MLV). Now, at $1.75 per sq foot, it is not cheap magic, but it is affordable. You would adhere this to your existing drywall (using and industrial air drive stapler), and then I would recommend that you drywall over it. This is actually a cost effective method for soundproofing your apartment room. Now, if you really want this material to be removable I would fore go the layer of drywall and simply wallpaper or paint the (MLV) with a vinyl or latex paint. Then when you move simply remove the (MLV) spackle the holes in that wall and then repaint the wall. This same procedure would be applicable got the ceiling as well.
Greg, let me know if I can be of more help to you. There are also common building type materials which can be used for soundproofing, but they would be harder to remove and take when you leave. I sure hope this has helped you Greg. Thanks for the post.



Bob Orther
Super Soundproofing Sales/Technical Associate.
Ph: (760) 752-3030    FAX: (760) 752-3040
URL: www.soundproofing.org
e-mail: boborther@soundproofing.org
Orders only (888) 942-7723
When Peace of Mind is all that Matters!

kevin taylor

  • Guest
Re: practice room
« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2003, 07:43:12 AM »
I plan on building a permanant SP room utilizing a double stud format. What I mean is, there will be a 2x10 on the floor and at the top, with 2x4's running vertically but offset from front to back. Within the 10" wall there will be galvinized wavie roofing tin w/asphalt sheeting on both sides, covered w/ pink insulation,running horozontaly, then sheetrock on both sides. There will be a minimum 6" clearance from the outside wall. The problem is the cieling, should I just recreate the walls only horozontally?
 I play drums, and I want to play them at 4:20 in the morning if I want to! Am I loonie, or will this work?

Boborther

  • Guest
Re: practice room
« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2003, 09:33:41 PM »
Kevin,

Basically you will want to float your ceiling either using the resilient channels or better yet the SSP sound clips and metal furring channels (hat channel).
These methods would both help to keep the drum sounds confined in the sound control room, and not allow them to travel out.
Now, granted, there is no such thing as perfect soundproofing, but you can get the room soundproofed to a level where you could indeed play your drums at 4:20 AM and not bother anyone.
As far as the staggered, or offset studs, this can actually be accomplished without building out the wall to 6 or 10 inches. We carry a very dense closed cell vinyl tape that you would adhere to every other stud, and then you would screw your drywall only into the studs that have been taped, and no screws in the non taped studs. This in essence changes the resonant frequency of the drywall, nd makes it a much better soundproofer, merely due to the fact that it is only making 1/2 the contact with the wood studs as it normally would.
Kevin, you are on the right track with the rolled roofing, but just make sure you caulk any and all seams gaps and crevas's. There are many economical ways to soundproof a room for music or a home theater, nd we are never afraid to tell you the other ways, whether we make the sale or not. The Bottomline is soundproofing from the outside world, and not necessarily money.
Thanks for the post Kevin, I hope this info helps.

Bob Orther
Super Soundproofing Sales/Technical Associate.
Ph: (760) 752-3030    FAX: (760) 752-3040
URL: www.soundproofing.org
e-mail: boborther@soundproofing.org
Orders only (888) 942-7723
When Peace of Mind is all that Matters!

bobby sanchez

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Re: practice room
« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2004, 03:19:33 AM »
we need a place to practice we got kicked out of our last place, i live in a townhouse with strange neighbors (not mean, but strange and with a baby)

before i logged on to this site i had an idea, tell me if you think it will work or not, give suggestions please

i was going to build a wall about 8 inches away from the existing walls. i would do this by using wood planks about 2 feet apart and use them as my basis for the drywall. i would put layers of styrofoam and pink insulation inside the 2 walls, about 6 inches of it total. since i want it to be temporary, just incase we move, i wanted to be able to take it down easily. to do this, i wanted to use an L shaped metal wedge to screw one side to the ceiling and one to the wood plank. i was then going to put carpets on the floor, pink insulation on the ceilings, and styrofoam on the garage door, i was also going to put a layer of pink insulation over the styrofoam on the garage door. tell me if this would work at all of am i just wasting my money. suggestions PLEASE!

Victoria

  • Guest
Re: practice room
« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2004, 04:45:29 PM »
Any ideas for noise control of a garage door closing?  We have to accept that they are noisy running, but the actual vibration and 'thud' that accompanies it, is there a solution?

ears4hire

  • Guest
Re: practice room
« Reply #11 on: December 20, 2008, 01:49:46 AM »
Don't forget to treat the walls so the Studio sounds good inside.

See the "Control Room Layout?" topic for more on this; an excerpt below:

The first reflections are a major concern as is bass resonance; bass traps are the typical solution for bass resonance. The location of treatment for the first reflections are very critical. If the room is all sheetrock the room will not have a flat response; it will be mid-bass heavy, so tuned panels maybe what you need. With harder construction materials the typical tuned panels may not be what you need.

David Kennedy
Acoustic Consultant

www.d-k-a.com
www.integrityacoustics.com
phone: 760-798-9038

mroom21

  • Guest
Re: practice room
« Reply #12 on: March 07, 2009, 11:04:28 PM »
I put together a soundproof music room 3 years ago in my basement.  While we're practicing, my family can watch TV, have conversations and even sleep!  The neighbors don't even know when we're playing, unless they see all the cars in the driveway.  I did alot of research before building the room, and ended up building it with standard materials found at a home center.  I put together a set of step-by-step plans that you can download.  Check it out at www.musicroomplans.info and see a video demonstration of the room in action!  The whole project cost about $1500.

 

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