Author Topic: Soundproofing in a new addition  (Read 4469 times)

Joslyn Pollock

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Soundproofing in a new addition
« on: August 07, 2003, 04:05:58 PM »
We are in the middle of a home office addition to our house, so the walls are open right now. They are a typical 2 x 4 non-staggered installation. We have cement slab to be covered with 3/8" thick floating vinyl tiles. We are going to have blown in wet cellulose for insulation in all walls, including interior walls. The final wall covering will be 3/8" thick beadboard paneling.



What treatment do you recommend as the next step to give us maximum benefit for sound proofing between rooms.



Can we staple the MLV to the ceiling as well where a recessed light fixture is going to be installed?



Thank you!

~~~Joslyn Pollock

Boborther

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Re: Soundproofing in a new addition
« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2003, 10:30:03 PM »
Joslyn,

First of all, yes you can staple up the (MLV), and that is actually the fastest and easiest way to install the (MLV). Don't forget the acoustical caulk for the seams and around the perimeter.
Next, if the cellulose is strictly for the thermal effect, then go ahead with that, but don't expect any soundproofing from blown in cellulose, no matter what the installer tells you. Fair nuff??
Next, if you can use anything but the canned (recessed) lights, I would do so. (eg. Track lighting) The recessed lights are a major breach in any soundproof system, whether it be a floated ceiling or simply applying the (MLV). Unless the recessed lights are self contained, (meaning there are no holes drilled in the back of the cans for ventilation), they have a tendency to leak massive amounts of sound through your ceiling. You can spend a fortune on soundproofing and these canned lights can make you efforts completely fruitless.
Lastly, I have a method of making your regular studded walls appear,  for all intense and purposes like a staggered stud wall. This is a simply and cost effective process of adhering a 1  7/16" closed cell foam tape to every other stud on your wall. You would then screw your drywall only into the taped studs, thus giving the same effect as a staggered stud wall without the hassle and expense of staggering. Staggered studs change the resonant frequency of the drywall itself, and hence help greatly in your soundproofing endeavor.
Well Joslyn, I sure hope this has answered al of your questions. Thanks for the posting.

Bob Orther
Super Soundproofing Sales/Technical Associate.
Ph: (760) 752-3030    FAX: (760) 752-3040
URL: www.soundproofing.org
e-mail: boborther@soundproofing.org
For orders only (888) 942-7723
When Peace of mind is all that matters!
[glb][/glb]

Joslyn Pollock

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Re: Soundproofing in a new addition
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2003, 01:36:25 AM »
Bob:



The recessed light (singular) is in the form of a Solatube skylight that has a light fixture in it. Mainly what we are trying to accomplish is to mute the transmission of noise coming through the walls & ceilings.



So the question remains if in your professional opinion it is safe to put the MLV around that potential heat source?



Yes, the installer did tell me I was going to reduce a lot of sound with the cellulose, but I think you just saved me $1200.00!



My last question with the closed cell foam, I assume it goes directly on the studs, then the MLV goes over that?



The website is extremely informative and helpful, THANKS BOB!



~~~Joslyn

Boborther

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Soundproofing in a new addition (revised reply)
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2003, 09:18:04 PM »
Joslyn,

Now for all you soundproofing fans, I had the privledge of talking to Joslyn this morning on the phone, and she is extremely well versed in soundproofing techniques,  design, and  installation. I think Bob Vila, and Norm Abrams could take a few  lessons from her. I can see it now, Joslyn hosts, This Old "Quiet" House. I like the sound of that!
Jo, the MLV is in no way a flame retardant material, it can burn just like any other class C building material, as opposed to  the closed cell foams which are very flame retardant.
The  C.C. foam is what I recommend for the incandesant light assembly. This will isolate and plug up any gaps between the Solatube light and the drywall itself.
Finally, in a soundproof wall or ceiling assembly, the closed cell foam lines the back of the cavity and completely covers the studs or joists. (you do not need to completely fill stud or joist cavities with the closed cell foam mat only line these areas).  This halts the woods ability to transmit sound into the outer ceiling or wall board.
Joslyn, if you ever need a job... oh never mind, you are already busy enough. Thanks again for the great post, like I have said before, you never know who might benefit from reading your posts.

Bob Orther
Super Soundproofing Sales/Technical Associate.
Ph: (760) 752-3030    FAX: (760) 752-3040
URL: www.soundproofing.org
e-mail: boborther@soundproofing.org
Orders only (888) 942-7723
When Peace of mind is all that matters!