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71
I would also ask whether a larger pad (4x4) helps or hurts.
Thanks
72
Hi there
Great site. I am learning so much about just about everything.

I live in an older condo on the top floor (floor 3), lucky me. Pretty good view. On my roof/ceiling right above my bedroom, are the six heat pump units for the units. Vibration from one or more of the units is causing vibration humming sounds. Before I reapproach the hoa, I have been trying to see if I can mitigate the problem by using isolation pads. Hoping it is not pipe vibrations.
Couple of questions.
(1) points of support - how many? The units are pretty small (300-400 lbs), so I see recommended four 2x2 pads (one in each corner). If four is good, does it make any sense to put more points of contact? i.e.: six? Add one more on each side or one in the center of the pan?
(2) thickness / how many layers? - if one layer is good, does it make sense to put a second layer (make a pad sandwich) just to be safe? I am looking at individual pad thickness of approx 5/8-3/4" for approx total double thickness of 1-1/2".
(3) D rating? - I see different durameter ratings available. All the way from d20 - d80.

Thanks in advance.
73
Hi I am new to the forum but have done some searching and still have some questions. I live less than a mile from an active earthquake fault and worry about too much ceiling weight if we get a big quake. Don't know if there are code stipulations in earthquake country about multiple sheets of sheetrock on RC channel etc. So we recently redid our foundation for earthquake safety and while doing so excavated another 2 feet so we now have 8 foot ceiling height. Our city, in a serious housing shortage, will now allow us to turn the basement into a secondary living unit and if we do so, I want to have excellent soundproofing separating main first floor living from tenants below. The ceiling, for the most part, is framed in 2x8 full dimensional doug fir joists. The floors above have 1x12 fir subfloors and maple or vg fir flooring. I was thinking of installing one layer of safe and sound followed by RC channel and then quietrock and using surface mounted lights. I have also seen the clips, which I assume block some vibration from the joists to the rc channel. At about 5 dollars a piece they seem costly for a 1400 square foot ceiling. Are they worth it and if so are any better or worse? Also, homasote does not seem that expensive or heavy. Does it make sense to rib sheets of homasote to 14" and install in the joist bays screwed to the subfloor (1x12 doug fir)? Is quietrock worth the money? Are 2 layers of safe and sound significantly better than one? Any other ideas?

Thanks

Rob
74
I've just started renting a condo and I'm in a corner unit with my neighbor's door right next to mine.  They have a mentally challenged daughter who vocalizes a lot.  I'm a software developer and I work from home, so someone yelling and screaming from time to time can be pretty distracting.

I've added weather stripping around the door so it's air tight, and that's helped the sound a bit, but not enough for my needs.

I've looked at some options, but reviews are all mixed.  Some of the things I've looked at are mass loaded vinyl, acoustic foam panels, and fiberglass foam panels.

Obviously it would have to be non-invasive (renting), I'd need to be able to make a hole to see through the peep hole, and any solutions would need to go on the inside of the door.

Any advice/suggestions are greatly appreciated!
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Other Soundproofing Questions / Re: Sistering joists--any point in putting green glue in between?
« Last post by Randy S on April 29, 2019, 03:41:20 PM »
just use construction adhesive and sister correctly, stiffening the subfloor will be better for noise anyway.
Your clips are the decoupler from the structure.
http://www.supersoundproofingsales.com/SSP-Clips-1/productinfo/09-IS/

Randy S.
760-752-3030
76
Other Soundproofing Questions / Sistering joists--any point in putting green glue in between?
« Last post by shayyadin on April 28, 2019, 02:44:29 PM »
I am in the middle of soundproofing my basement ceiling. Overall project is to fill bays with roxul, attach noise isolation clips to bottoms of joists, furring channels to clips, and quiet rock to furring channels.

After taking down the old ceiling, I noticed that some of the joists had been notched improperly and were showing some cracks. Structural engineer said not a problem yet but recommends sistering the joists to prevent issues down the road. Sistering involves putting construction adhesive between the old joist and the new, then bolting them together. Obviously, the bolt represents a direct coupling.

Any point in using green glue instead of construction adhesive? I'm sure it doesn't do any harm, but it's a waste of money if it's not getting me anything.
77
Soundproofing your Condo, Townhouse or Bed & Breakfast / Re: Cement ceiling impact noise
« Last post by Randy S on April 24, 2019, 04:00:40 PM »
just make sure your new frame does not touch walls and ceiling.
make sure the frame can hold 10-20 lbs sqft depending on how much reduction you want.

Best rooms can come in at 25lbs sqft.

your room value will be dictated by the weak spots like doors.

NO SUCH THING AS 100% SOUNDPROOF!
there is always a sound wave low enough to go through these walls...at some value.

Randy S.
760-752-3030
78
room within a room (rwar) is always the best if you have the space for it .
depending on span you would lose 12" to 14" of ceiling height

Randy S.
760-752-3030

That's fine as my ceiling is 2.85 m high.

What about each side of the room? How much space would I lose in case I want to make the most soundproof room possible?

Also, what kind of Decibel reduction should I be expecting? Will the noise disappear completely?

Thanks!
79
Soundproofing your Condo, Townhouse or Bed & Breakfast / Re: Cement ceiling impact noise
« Last post by Randy S on April 22, 2019, 07:45:07 PM »
room within a room (rwar) is always the best if you have the space for it .
depending on span you would lose 12" to 14" of ceiling height

Randy S.
760-752-3030
80
Wouldn't building a room within my room be a better option as I also play loud music and drums?   
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