Super Soundproofing Community Forum

Soundproofing Forum Topics => Soundproofing Windows and Doors => Topic started by: spiidey on February 03, 2013, 01:47:29 PM

Title: Soundproofing Window
Post by: spiidey on February 03, 2013, 01:47:29 PM
Am looking to soundproof a bed room and are in the process of appointing a company to carry out works to the floor, walls, ceiling and door in the room.  The company don't do the window so we need to separately purchase a combination of triple glazing / secondary glazing.

Triple glazing would comprise 44mm unit with 6mm/4mm/8.8mm glass (8.8mm laminated PVB) with 12mm cavities in between each pane, filled 90% with Argon Gas.

Secondary Glazing would be single pane 6.8mm pilkington / stadip acoustic laminated glass.

We'd have an air gap/cavity between the triple and seconary glazing of approx 120mm

Have been thinking about where any potential weak points could arise and was wondering what other's views are on the following:-

1.  Should the internal window sill also be replaced, and if so, with what material?
2. What type of window frame will work best - uPVC, Aluminium, Timber, something else?
3. I read somewhere and can't find the link now about a sound absorption material that could be put in the air gap/cavity between the triple and secondary glazing (it would attach to the wall around top, bottom and each side) be approx 30mm thick and reduce reverberation in the cavity.  Any idea where this type of material could be purchased?

We live in the UK.  Many thanks for any help anyone can provide.
Title: Re: Soundproofing Window
Post by: Randy S on February 05, 2013, 05:36:09 PM
The only way your going to improve this system of 2 windows with a 3" air gap would be to have 2 separate wall with separate window boxes that are not connected. On single frame construction your at the diminishing point of return until you convert over to a complex structure.

You need to make sure you seal between the rough frame and the window casings air tight.

 
Title: Re: Soundproofing Window
Post by: spiidey on February 05, 2013, 08:58:17 PM
The only way your going to improve this system of 2 windows with a 3" air gap would be to have 2 separate wall with separate window boxes that are not connected. On single frame construction your at the diminishing point of return until you convert over to a complex structure.

You need to make sure you seal between the rough frame and the window casings air tight.

 

Hi Randy

Thanks for the reply.

Not sure I follow what you mean though - the construction of the property is breeze block on external wall, cavity, then further breeze block on internal side.

External window would sit flush with the cavity in the middle of the two breezeblocks, secondary glazing would sit 4" in from this (so 4" air gap, does that help)?

What's best way/material to use to seal air tight between rough frame and window casings?
Title: Re: Soundproofing Window
Post by: Randy S on February 05, 2013, 10:04:07 PM
ok if that is the construction then you already have a complex structure.

one window in each breeze block wall with out a path between the for vibration to travel.


use caulking to seal,  if the gap is too large use something as a backer and cover with a layer of caulking to seal.
Title: Re: Soundproofing Window
Post by: spiidey on February 24, 2013, 03:35:58 PM
Hi Randy

Any thoughts on what type of window sill should be installed to replace the existing window sill (i.e. what type of wood or other material)?

Or should there be no window sill and something else (e.g. acoustic tiles) used between the double/triple glazed unit and the secondary glazed unit?

Kind Regards

Gary
Title: Re: Soundproofing Window
Post by: whatismisophonia on February 24, 2013, 08:07:02 PM
I also have a question regarding that; normally people do clad the inside of the window cavity with trim, but if allowed to run from one wall to the other in a double wall system, this would serve as a structural coupler.  That being the case, it is good for the trim to be split in the middle all the way around the interior of a double wall, and the gap filled with acoustic caulk or some other flexible material.  But my question is, can't the gap just remain open with nothing bridging it?  At first I wondered if it had something to do with serving as a fire block, though that seems non-sensical.  Couldn't I just cover the span from one rough wall frame or trim piece to the other with rigid fiberglass or melamine foam or something? 
Title: Re: Soundproofing Window
Post by: Randy S on February 25, 2013, 05:08:40 PM
I also have a question regarding that; normally people do clad the inside of the window cavity with trim, but if allowed to run from one wall to the other in a double wall system, this would serve as a structural coupler.  That being the case, it is good for the trim to be split in the middle all the way around the interior of a double wall, and the gap filled with acoustic caulk or some other flexible material.  But my question is, can't the gap just remain open with nothing bridging it?  At first I wondered if it had something to do with serving as a fire block, though that seems non-sensical.  Couldn't I just cover the span from one rough wall frame or trim piece to the other with rigid fiberglass or melamine foam or something? 

You definitely want to seal the gap with caulking. with out the seal you allow air and sound into the system which the reduction value is reliant on dead air space. Remember the glass is not as strong as the wall.
If you use a foam it would have to be a closed cell foam...something you cant blow air through.
 
Title: Re: Soundproofing Window
Post by: Randy S on February 25, 2013, 05:34:03 PM
Hi Randy

Any thoughts on what type of window sill should be installed to replace the existing window sill (i.e. what type of wood or other material)?

Or should there be no window sill and something else (e.g. acoustic tiles) used between the double/triple glazed unit and the secondary glazed unit?

Kind Regards

Gary

Just use standard 2x8 or 2x10 depending on the distance you have to cover, just make sure there is a 1/4" or 3/8" gap between the 2 sills and that gap to be filled with acoustical caulk. You can add drywall to make it look nice, but again leave a gap and fill with caulk...no connections between window sills.