Author Topic: woodworking in an apartment  (Read 2089 times)

Miriam Kearney

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woodworking in an apartment
« on: September 02, 2001, 07:12:07 PM »
It may be difficult or impossible and we are detremined to give it our best shot. We live on the 2nd floor of a 3 story apartment building and are setting up a wood working shop in our extra bedroom. Although we haven't had any complaints yet (we are careful when we use it) we want to reduce the sound as much as is feasible given our conditions. The room is currently broadloomed and we have covered the floor with cotton canvas to protect the carpet.
We are thinking of buying some 1 1/2" pink (tongue and groove) styrofoam and covering the floor (on top of the carpet) with this and then putting some tongue and groove fibreboard (11/16") on this.
After reading your site and a large number of the posts I am wondering if this will actually make any serious difference.
We are planning to suspend the pink styrofoam from the ceiling with a grid of wires - the foam would go wall to wall - no gaps and have dead air space above it.
We are also planning on closing in our table saw and perhaps filling the cavities inside the saw itself with the styrofoam or other material and reducing the vibration of the blade with something called a blade stabilizer. \
We will install a solid core door on the room and the idea of your loaded mass vinyl seems like a good idea on the inside of this with it overlapping the edges.
I would appreciate any comments or other suggestions. Our limitations are money (obviously) although we are willing to spend reasonably for this (woodworking is our passion) and the fact that we cannot get into the floor or ceiling. This is an old building with very large studs and joists (the wall studs are true 6x6's)with many layers of paster and lathe and finally wall board.
By the way - we live in Canada so money for your products is 1.6 x your prices plus shipping. Again that doesn't make it prohibitive, we just have to be responsible.
Thanks.



bjnash

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Re: woodworking in an apartment
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2001, 04:04:47 PM »

: It may be difficult or impossible and we are detremined to give it our best shot. We live on the 2nd floor of a 3 story apartment building and are setting up a wood working shop in our extra bedroom. Although we haven't had any complaints yet (we are careful when we use it) we want to reduce the sound as much as is feasible given our conditions. The room is currently broadloomed and we have covered the floor with cotton canvas to protect the carpet.
: We are thinking of buying some 1 1/2" pink (tongue and groove) styrofoam and covering the floor (on top of the carpet) with this and then putting some tongue and groove fibreboard (11/16") on this.
: After reading your site and a large number of the posts I am wondering if this will actually make any serious difference.
: We are planning to suspend the pink styrofoam from the ceiling with a grid of wires - the foam would go wall to wall - no gaps and have dead air space above it.
: We are also planning on closing in our table saw and perhaps filling the cavities inside the saw itself with the styrofoam or other material and reducing the vibration of the blade with something called a blade stabilizer. \
: We will install a solid core door on the room and the idea of your loaded mass vinyl seems like a good idea on the inside of this with it overlapping the edges.
: I would appreciate any comments or other suggestions. Our limitations are money (obviously) although we are willing to spend reasonably for this (woodworking is our passion) and the fact that we cannot get into the floor or ceiling. This is an old building with very large studs and joists (the wall studs are true 6x6's)with many layers of paster and lathe and finally wall board.
: By the way - we live in Canada so money for your products is 1.6 x your prices plus shipping. Again that doesn't make it prohibitive, we just have to be responsible.
: Thanks.
The main problem withyour plan is the use of styrofoam.  Some say it actually amplifys sound!  You should make a plan based on where the noise will go most and concentrate on theat: for instance if down through the floor, deal with that first, etc.  Lots of info on the site, but because of the project I'd suggest getting more info before you start,  Get the book!


 

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